10 months agoBrighton boss Hughton: Dunk return key to Everton win

first_imgBrighton boss Hughton: Dunk return key to Everton winby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton boss Chris Hughton was happy to have Lewis Dunk back for their 1-0 win over Everton.Dunk returned to keep a clean sheet alongside Shane Duffy in the heart of defence, and Hughton was pleased to see the pair rekindle their successful partnership.“It’s important because they know each other very well, and that’s not taking anything away from Leon Balogun, who’s played well in the last few games for us.“But they’re a partnership that know each other very well, and they had to deal with a fair bit of pressure towards the end of the game.“It’s been a good year for us. We’re on the back of two really good performances, both at home against two very good teams.“That puts us in good stead, but we now go through a difficult away game on Wednesday and we’ll have to show a lot of what we’ve showed over the last two games.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

4-Star LB Ellis Brooks Announces Decommitment From Duke On Twitter

first_imgEllis Brooks' decommitment from Duke.This past March, Duke football scored a huge get, landing the services of four-star linebacker Ellis Brooks. Friday, Brooks announced that he’s changed his mind. Brooks, a product of Richmond, Virginia, took to Twitter to decommit from the Blue Devils – thanking the team’s coaching staff in the process.Brooks is a 6-foot-2, 230-pound player for the class of 2017, according to 247 Sports. Hereby reopening my recruitment after careful consideration with my family pic.twitter.com/wcKlhEidkX— Ellis Brooks (@EllisBrooks35) May 20, 2016Brooks currently has offers from over a dozen schools, including Michigan, Notre Dame and Virginia Tech.last_img

Media magnate Peladeau evasive about potential return to politics

first_imgMONTREAL – Quebec telecom and media magnate Pierre Karl Peladeau renewed speculation Tuesday he is considering a return to politics.His abrupt departure in May 2016 as head of the Parti Quebecois was against his will and due to family reasons, he told Radio-Canada.But things have changed since then, he suggested.“Obviously I remain ready for the (political) moment,” Peladeau said, unprompted, to the radio host during a wide-ranging interview. “Maybe, eventually you would have asked me about that.”Anyone following the social media posts of the self-avowed nationalist who wanted to be leader of an independent Quebec will not be surprised he is not closing the door to an eventual political comeback.As head of Quebecor Inc., Peladeau owns some of the most popular media and telecom properties in the country and the businessman isn’t shy about using his influence and profile to publicly criticize his opponents.He has come out strongly against the Quebec Liberal’s investment in aerospace giant Bombardier, as well as the government’s recent multimillion-dollar aid package to newspaper companies in competition with his own.Peladeau has also attacked Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for the federal government’s refusal to levy a tax on online streaming giant Netflix.“When I think we are going in the wrong direction, when we as a collective are going in the wrong direction … it’s the reason why I speak out and there is no one who will stop me,” he said Tuesday.Peladeau’s remarks were in response to a recent column in Montreal La Presse, a major news outlet owned by Power Corp. of Canada and controlled by a powerful Quebec family he’s openly feuded with for years.In the column, Yves Boisvert suggested Peladeau is the de facto leader of Quebec’s opposition, due to the media mogul’s constant and aggressive public sorties on social media.“For the time being, he is the CEO of a very large communications company and should show a little better that he understands the difference between his old job as a politician, even if he is bored, and his new job, even if it is only temporary,” Boisvert wrote.Peladeau countered: “Who is he to tell me what I can say?”Despite the businessman’s public statements, the speculation around his potential return to politics is being fed by the slow decline in popularity of the PQ.The party has been polling in third place for months as it loses support among critical francophone voters and in the outlying regions where it has been historically strong.“We have a leader right now and it’s Jean-Francois Lisee,” Peladeau said, conspicuously using the term “we,” while reminding the radio host he is still a member of the party. “I have always been attentive to collegiality … I would like to leave my colleagues continue their political work.”Lisee was asked later in the day about Peladeau’s comments and said, “the door is wide open.”Peladeau, he added, would be welcome to run for the PQ in the Oct. 1 election.When asked if a potential return would threaten his leadership, Lisee responded, “we need to have a strong team. I am a leader who wants to be surrounded by strong team members who have ambition.”Bernard Drainville, a former PQ cabinet minister close to Peladeau and who recently joined his television network, said, “according to his entourage, Peladeau misses politics.”Drainville made the comments on a popular news commentary show on Peladeau’s flagship news network, LCN.“But will Peladeau lead a putsch to remove Lisee? The answer is no.”And as for his family situation, Peladeau suggested it is improving.When he quit the PQ in May 2016 after about a year at the helm, he cited family reasons amid his separation from his partner at the time.Peladeau said he was watching TV recently with his nine-year-old daughter, when she told him she wanted him to run for office again.“We now have shared custody, as decided by a court,” Peladeau said. “I’m not sure if I will follow (my daughter’s) advice, but just to put things into context, things evolve.”Companies in this story: (TSX:QBR.B, TSX:POW)last_img read more

Months of deadly unrest devastate Nicaraguas economy

first_imgLEON, Nicaragua – Two days after protests began in Nicaragua in April, a foreign auto components company was meeting at a hotel in the city of Leon when smoke from a burning university building just a block away billowed above the hotel’s colonnaded courtyard.The visitors quickly cut short their event and began changing their travel plans to exit Nicaragua. Within three months, the El Convento hotel itself was forced to close for lack of business, as a sister hotel in the same city had in June.Nicaragua’s economy has been devastated by the nearly five months of unrest sparked by cuts to social security benefits that quickly evolved into calls for President Daniel Ortega to step down.In June, the country’s economic activity was down 12.1 per cent compared to a year earlier, according to the central bank. Economists estimate 200,000 jobs have been shed, including as many as 70,000 in the tourism sector, which has become Nicaragua’s top source of foreign currency in the past two years.Revenue at hotels and restaurants plunged 45 per cent in June compared to 2017, according to Nicaragua’s central bank. Similarly, construction suffered a 35 per cent drop and retail 27 per cent. Some $900 million in deposits fled Nicaragua’s banks. They responded by tightening their lending to preserve liquidity, thus also contributed to the economic slowdown.Nicaraguan Union of Agricultural Producers says more than 12,000 acres of private land have been occupied by government supporters in what business leaders have called confiscations in revenge for their support of the protesters.The producers say 91 per cent of the land occupied by squatters was used for farming and livestock.Victor Hugo Sevilla, the general manager of both Leon hotels, continues checking email, but said “I haven’t gotten any requests from foreigners for reservations. We have received five, maybe eight, rate inquiries from domestic (travellers), but no firm reservations.”Leon, Nicaragua’s second-largest city, was among the places where protests and roadblocks were most intense. From the beginning, those protests were met with violence from riot police and civilian government supporters. In July, they violently cleared the roadblocks and ran protesting students off occupied university campuses.More than 300 people have been killed in the unrest, according to human rights groups. The government calls the protesters “terrorists” and says it defeated an attempt to drive Ortega from office that was sponsored by the U.S. government and domestic opposition, including some in the private sector.Ortega conceded this month that the roadblocks and unrest have cost the country jobs. In an interview with Spanish news agency EFE, he said domestic tourism was starting to return, but “where there has been more of a problem is in attracting international tourism, because this situation tends to repel the tourists.”A major factor has been that the countries that send Nicaragua’s big-spending foreign tourists, including the U.S., Canada, Spain and England, issued travel warnings urging their citizens to avoid travel to Nicaragua.Major airlines such as American and United cut their flights to Managua from three per day to one. Spirit, Delta and other carriers trimmed their flights as well, said Jose Adan Aguerri, president of the Superior Council for Private Enterprise.The council, which is Nicaragua’s main business chamber, joined the call for a national strike Sept. 7. The Civic Alliance, formed to represent a broad swath of Nicaraguan society in a stalled dialogue with the government, said the strike aimed to push the government back to dialogue and to protest the arrest of alliance members and other political prisoners.The country’s primary tourist destinations like the colonial gem Granada and the Pacific coast surfer paradise San Juan del Sur began feeling the consequences of the unrest almost immediately. Hotels and restaurants cut back hours, then days and eventually closed completely.For years, Ortega enjoyed a relatively stable relationship with private business. Since returning to power in 2007, the one-time Marxist rebel commander had softened his views and largely left Nicaragua’s private sector to do what it wanted.The relationship was criticized by some as a tacit agreement to keep the country’s business elites out of politics. In an interview in July with Venezuela’s Telesur network, Ortega said his understanding with Nicaragua’s private sector had been strictly economic and not political.In April, however, the country’s business interests, caught off guard by the social security system changes, quickly joined the opposition. As the social and political crisis deepened, the private sector became increasingly outspoken in calling for Ortega to move up elections.Mario Arana, director of the Nicaragua Association of Producers and Exporters and a former head of the central bank, said the private sector decided to get more involved when student protesters were killed.“When there was an overreaction here to a civil, peaceful protest by the students, where people began to lose their lives, society suffered a social explosion where the private sector aligned with the people,” he said. “The private sector is committed to trying to find a negotiated exit from the crisis.”Juan Sebastian Chamorro, who leads the Nicaraguan Foundation for Economic and Social Development, said the government has shown signs that it recognizes the severity of the economic impact. It has issued new debt, adjusted rules to tighten the selling of dollars and cut public spending as it forecasts a 10 per cent drop in tax revenue.Whether any of that will be enough to stop the economy’s slide is doubtful unless it’s accompanied by a political solution that restores stability, experts said.On Wednesday in Washington, the Organization of American States called on Nicaragua’s government to co-operate with teams investigating human rights abuses and a working group created by the body to support a national dialogue.Nicaragua’s ambassador to the body, Luis Alvarado, responded that the government does not recognize the existence of the working group and therefore had nothing to answer to.For years Leon had been at best a day trip for foreign tourists beginning to explore better-known Granada or San Juan del Sur. But the city had worked hard to get attention and Art Collection Hotels had bet on its prospects by opening its second hotel, La Recoleccion, in 2017.“We had high expectations for this year,” said Sevilla, the manager of the closed hotels.He had 113 employees between the two properties. They were able to suspend 67, which will enable them to come back without losing any benefits of seniority, but the rest were laid off. He has remained in touch with some of the workers. Those still around are taking whatever work they can find, but he estimated at least half left the country, with most of those seeking tourism sector jobs in Costa Rica.The hotels have 190 reservations for November — the start of the high season — but that’s less than half what they had in November last year. Still, he hopes they can start working their way back again in October. Even if that works out, he predicts a slow climb back to normalcy.Cafes and shops selling handicrafts around Leon’s historic centre were open this week, but a number of hotels and hostels in the area were shuttered.“I think it will take at least 12 months, maybe more, to be able to restart the tourism engine,” he said.___Sherman reported from Mexico City. AP writers Maria Verza contributed to this report from Managua and Luis Alonso Lugo contributed from Washington.last_img read more

Canadian tech companies look to cash in on cannabis with innovations and

first_imgTORONTO – One of John Lem’s first hints that the technology behind his DNA testing company Spartan Bioscience could be a hit with cannabis users came years ago when an executive asked him if genetics could have caused a bad reaction to pot.The question intrigued Lem so much that he eventually applied Spartan’s technology to a new Toronto-based venture called Lobo Genetics. Through Lobo, he created a genetic testing device that fits in the palm of a hand and uses cells obtained through a cheek swab to measure a person’s ability to metabolize THC — the main psychoactive component in cannabis — and determine someone’s predisposition to short- and long-term side effects.Lobo believes it could be a hit with health-care practitioners and medical marijuana users, but has also recently experienced a flurry of interest from the recreational industry.“We thought the med pool was going to be first in terms of adoption, but dramatically on the rec side, there are a lot of potential opportunities,” Lem said.The boom Lem is seeing puts Lobo Genetics among a wave of tech companies benefiting from the Oct. 17 legalization of recreational cannabis in Canada.Already the pot tech industry has seen the debut of Toronto start-up Strainprint Technologies Inc., which makes it easy to track and manage the dosage and effects of pot, and California-founded Weedmaps, which helps users find locations throughout Canada where they can buy the substance. Also cashing in on the pot tech rush are Ottawa-based Shopify, which powers provincial and private marijuana e-commerce offerings, and cannabis companies like Lift & Co., which runs a reviews app.“There has been no shortage of entrepreneurs getting out there,” said Dan Skilleter, Lobo’s director of policy and communications. “The last year has been so busy for cannabis and certainly Lobo saw the opportunity.”Skilleter and Lem said Lobo has only launched on a pilot basis, but is already seeing enthusiasm.Those high hopes have spread to Winnipeg, where Save the Drive is readying a platform that allows people to hire a personal shopper to buy and deliver weed.Its chief executive officer Chanel Graham said it has yet to launch because of weed shortages and required changes to legislation, but legalization has already brought a spike in interest.“I am surprised how many people reached out right on Oct. 17, hoping that we were in operation,” said Graham. “We have had quite a few customers contacting us.”The same is true for cannabis-centric social networking platform High There!The Florida-based venture, which helps users find buds to, well, smoke buds with, said it has seen a 300 per cent increase in sign-ups since legalization and plenty of those new users are based in Montreal, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver.Over at Strainprint, chief executive officer Andrew Muroff said users in Calgary, Vancouver and Toronto have flocked to the app it launched in 2016 the most.Strainprint, which has focused on medical marijuana users but works just as well for recreational users, unveiled an education resource the day before legalization to take advantage of the attention pot would garner.However, with its launch and legalization lining up, Muroff said, “We did see a lift, but it is hard for me to know if it came from legalization.”Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version misstated Strainprint’s launch date.last_img read more

Destination BC provides 4 million to support provincewide tourism projects

first_imgVANCOUVER, B.C. – Destination B.C. has announced that it is providing $4 million to support 57 tourism projects across British Columbia this year.Destination B.C. says this funding is through its Co-operative Marketing Partnerships Program which aims to increase collaboration and alignment of marketing activities across the province, including Northeastern B.C.Northeastern municipalities, which includes Fort St. John, Northern Rockies, Chetwynd, Pouce Coupe, Tumbler Ridge, Hudson Hope, Taylor, and Dawson Creek, are working collaboratively to develop and promote Northeastern B.C. tourism, such as highlighting the Tumbler Ridge UNESCO Global Geopark and the Alaska Highway Corridor. CEO of the Northern B.C. Tourism Association, Clint Fraser, says collaboration is a critical component when it comes to promoting tourism and that the Tourism Association looks forward to continuing to support the Northeast.“Collaboration is a critical component to successfully promote tourism experiences in the region. Northeast BC and the Alaska Highway are iconic travel destinations and access to funding through Destination B.C.’s Co-op Marketing Partnerships Program assists in developing inspiring content and promotional initiatives that elevate awareness of the region with travellers. We look forward to continuing to support the efforts of the Northeast BC Tourism Marketing Cooperative.”According to Destination B.C., in 2017 the tourism industry employed over 137,800 people with $4.9 billion in wages and has contributed $9 billion to the economy over the past decade.last_img read more

Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz on Ohio State They pose a lot of

Iowa running back Mark Weisman (45) rushes down the field during a game agianst Minnesota at TCF Bank Stadium Sept. 28. Iowa won, 23-7.Credit: Courtesy of MCTThrough its first six games, Iowa (4-2, 1-1) is the only member of the 125-team Football Bowl Subdivision who has not allowed a rushing touchdown yet this season. Ohio State’s 11th ranked rushing attack plans to put the Hawkeyes’ streak to the test.The chance to be the first team to reach the end zone on the ground against Iowa this season is “definitely an incentive” for the Buckeye offense, redshirt-senior center Corey Linsley said.“Coaches don’t need to say too much. They just put a piece a paper on our desk and say, ‘They haven’t allowed a rushing touchdown,’ and we kind of get it,” Linsley said.Iowa has one of the nation’s best defenses, ranking ninth nationally in total defense with an average of 290 yards allowed per game.“They’re in the top 10 in America and our kids know that,” OSU coach Urban Meyer said of the Iowa defense. “We’re working really hard. They’re good. They’re really sound.”Linsley said the matchup with Iowa’s defensive line will be the toughest opposition the OSU offensive line has faced all season.“They’re physical, they’re tough, they’re big,” Linsley said. “In terms of toughness, in terms of things that we preach and the values that we take, hold to, that’s what they’re about as well on the defensive line.”Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz said he thinks the OSU offensive line will challenge the Hawkeye defense.“It’s going to be a tough matchup for us,” Ferentz said. “They look good. They’re big, tall, imposing guys. They look like an NFL line, and they (are) extremely well-coached.”Overall, Ferentz said OSU’s scoring offense, which ranks sixth in the FBS with an average of 46.8 points per game, is “extremely talented.”“Look at their offense, pick a position and try to find a weakness,” Ferentz said. “Good luck on that one.”The Hawkeyes are going to have to be prepared for numerous running threats from the OSU offense to keep their streak alive.Senior running back Carlos Hyde is expected to lead the Buckeyes’ rushing attack Saturday after rushing for 168 yards and three touchdowns against Northwestern Oct. 5.Additionally, senior running back Jordan Hall, who leads the Buckeyes with 69 rushing attempts, 427 rushing yards and eight touchdowns this season, is expected to be back on the field Saturday, Meyer said, after missing the game against Northwestern with a joint issue in his knee.“His first way of assisting the team will be on special teams and then he can certainly complement Carlos and be also involved in third downs,” Meyer said of Hall.As a passer, junior quarterback Braxton Miller has completed 49 of 75 passing attempts for 609 yards and six touchdowns with two interceptions this season. His ability to make plays passing the ball will make it tougher for the Hawkeyes to defend the run, Ferentz said.“They pose a lot of problems in a lot of different areas,” Ferentz said. “They can throw it very effectively … (Miller is) a great running threat, as is (Hyde) … It makes it tough to play defense. You can’t really tilt your team one way or the other.”Ferentz said he would like the game to be low-scoring but realizes other teams have been unsuccessful in keeping games that way against OSU.“I’m not a great fan of getting in shootouts any time,” Ferentz said. “I mean if we had a lopsided lead, that’d be OK, I wouldn’t mind that, but not many teams have done that to Ohio State in recent history. Trying to contain their offense, that’s going to be quite a challenge.”Linsley said it will be important for the OSU offense, who has outscored its opponents 126 to 28 in the first quarter this season, to control the tempo of the game from the beginning.“We’ve got to score right off the bat, and then after that, we got to manage the clock by running the football,” Linsley said.While OSU is trying to end Iowa’s six-game streak of not allowing a rushing touchdown, the Hawkeyes will be trying to end a streak that dates back to the start of the 2012 season. The Buckeyes have won all 18 of its games with Meyer as coach, and hold the nation’s longest winning streak.“They’re approaching 20 straight wins and you don’t do that by accident,” Ferentz said. “It takes more than just having good players … they’ve been very, very consistent. If you look at the rate they’re scoring points and they’re moving the football, that doesn’t happen by accident either.”Part of the challenge in Iowa’s effort to end OSU’s win streak will be the Buckeye defense, which ranks 15th nationally with an average of 326.2 yards allowed per game and 24th in the FBS with 19.2 points allowed per game.“We look across, we see a team that’s very, very talented,” Ferentz said. “That includes their defense. They got phenomenally gifted athletes on the back end, I think they’re playing well and certainly that’s the case with the guys up front too … it’s hard to find a weak spot on their football team.”Iowa’s rushing attack is led by junior Mark Weisman, who has rushed for 624 yards and three touchdowns on 126 attempts this season, and ranks 32nd nationally in yards per game. Weisman said that going against the Buckeye defense is going to be tough.“They have a great defensive line, great linebackers, good secondary,” Weisman said. “They’ve pretty much stopped every rushing attack this year, so it’s going to be a real tough challenge for us.”Another challenge OSU could present to Iowa is the environment of Ohio Stadium, where Saturday’s game is scheduled to be played at 3:30 p.m.“The ‘Shoe is just by nature, it’s one of the tighter, louder places I think in our conference,” Ferentz said. “We’ve been on the road a couple times this year … but we haven’t been in an environment like the one we’re going to be in Saturday and against an opponent like this, so that’s going to be another degree of difficulty.”If the Buckeyes extend their win streak to 19 games Saturday, they would tie the 2002-03 Buckeyes for the second-longest winning streak in school history. read more

Inter plotting a controversial move for AC Milan star

first_imgInter Milan are plotting to make a rather controversial move for Suso this summer from local rivals AC Milan, reports Gianluca Di MarzioLuciano Spalletti’s side have already added Argentine forward Lautaro Martinez to their ranks this summer and are hoping to conclude a deal with AS Roma for midfielder Radja Nainggolan.But, ahead of their return to the Champions League next season, Inter are still keen to further reinforce their offensive options and have made signing Suso to be a top priority.Romelu Lukaku, Serie A, Inter MilanCapello calls Lukaku “a modern striker” Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 The former Italian manager believes Romelu Lukaku is perfectly suited for Antonio Conte’s Internazionale Milan in the Serie A.The Nerazzurri are hopeful that they will be able to make the move happen due to Milan having failed to qualify for the Champions League and now facing the prospect of being kicked out of Europe altogether for next season due to their ongoing financial troubles.The 18-time Serie champions may be tempted into selling Suso this summer in order to raise some badly needed funds with the 24-year-old having a €40m release clause inserted into his contract.However, a problem for Inter is that Suso’s release clause is only valid for clubs outside of Italy and they will have to face the uninviting prospect of trying to negotiate a suitable fee with their bitter rivals in order to seal a deal.last_img read more

Sterling reveals the secret behind prolific form

first_imgRaheem Sterling has revealed how he has evolved from trying to do fancy tricks and flicks into being a prolific goalscorer.Sterling, 23, has been in excellent form for Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City this season, scoring four goals and providing two assists.Sterling knows he needs to deliver in an England shirt as well but, at club level, he has lived up to the billing after bringing a new maturity and understanding to his game.Sterling told Daily Mirror: “The main thing now is to keep trying to be a goal threat.“When I was a bit younger, I wasn’t too interested in scoring goals, I was all about trying to look nice and show people I’ve got a lot of ability.Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“But now I’ve started to realise that no one remembers the fancy stuff you do on the pitch, it’s about the effectiveness and what you do for your team.“As I’m growing and developing, I understand that now, especially with the national team because I need to get these goals going.“I think I’m probably more driven now to be able to get on the end of things, being in the box a lot more.“Before, I was going wide, trying to beat a player and now I’m trying to get on the end of stuff, being around for scraps and trying to make goals for myself.“I’m much more confident when I’m in and around the penalty area now so I feel the goals will come for England as they have been doing for City.”last_img read more