Bassnectar Announces Mysterious Two Day Festival Event In Atlantic City

first_imgRenowned producer Bassnectar has revealed plans (well, some plans) for a brand new festival event in Atlantic City, NJ. Following the success of his event in Atlanta last year, Bassnectar has blocked off April 28th and 29th for a two day party featuring performances from ill.Gates, Caspa, Eprm, Nosaj Thing, Ninth Child and The Widdler.Interestingly enough, Bassnectar is keeping the location of the event hidden until “deep o’clock,” according to the announcement. The press release reads: “The theme is ‘creativity’ and we beckon you to join us in co-creating a one-of-a-kind experience – the intention is not to put on a “show” – but to gather from far and wide under one roof: a destination weekend event that is truly a family affair!” According to the artwork, there will not only be performances, but The Haven Sanctuary Space, Interactive Gift Altar, Creativity Zones, Art Participation Areas and more.You can read more about the show here, and see the artwork below.last_img read more

Sustainable Agriculture

first_img“Having the Georgia Organics conference here allows us to highlight all the research and Extension work we have in this area,” she said. During the two-day conference, UGA faculty hosted farm tours at UGArden, the organic farm at Durham Horticulture Farm and at the J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center—UGA’s hub for sustainable agriculture research and public outreach. They also hosted hands-on workshops. Pioneers in sustainable agriculture, backyard gardeners and urban homesteaders gathered in Athens this month to share knowledge gathered over years of working the land and to learn new skills from researchers at the University of Georgia. From soil health research to breeding programs for organically produced crops, faculty and staff at UGA have worked to improve the sustainability and efficiency of organic farms in Georgia. “Many people don’t realize how much work we have going on in sustainable agriculture,” said Julia Gaskin, sustainable agriculture coordinator for the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) and winner of Georgia Organics’ 2015 Land Steward Award. Lawton Stewart, assistant professor of animal and dairy science, and Dennis Hancock, associate professor of crop and soil sciences, taught an introductory workshop on sustainable grazing. David Berle, associate professor of horticulture, and JoHannah Biang, UGArden farm manager, taught a class of beginning farmers and gardeners how to build raised beds and how to repair and use small farm machinery. Peter Hartel, retired professor of crop and soil sciences, and Elizabeth Little, assistant professor in plant pathology, helped farmers inspect soil from their farms using microscopes and interpret findings in terms of soil health. Suzanne Stone, a graduate student in horticulture, and Little, assistant professor of plant pathology, helped lead a discussion on the need for better crop varieties for organic producers. Gaskin and George Boyhan, professor of horticulture, gave a workshop on selecting cover crops and how to maximize their benefit.Judy Harrison, professor of foods and nutrition in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, gave updated conference attendees on the Food Safety and Modernization Act and how it affects produce coming from small farms.Bob Waldorf, an Extension coordinator in Banks County, gave an update on UGA’s Master Goat Farmer program. In addition to the tours and workshops, 12 UGA graduate students presented posters on their research at the conference. “You can’t have a conversation about agriculture in Georgia without involving the University of Georgia,” said Alice Rolls, executive director of Georgia Organics. “Agriculture and UGA are synonymous here, and growers of all sizes and types depend on UGA’s research and leadership.” “Without UGA, Georgia Organics’ work and farming in general would be so much more difficult, and that’s why we are grateful to count the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences as an ally in our work to put more Georgia food on Georgia tables,” Rolls added. This most recent Georgia Organics conference is just the latest collaboration between Georgia Organics and the faculty of CAES and UGA Extension. In addition to working on numerous educational programs over the years, Georgia Organics recently collaborated with UGA and several other agricultural advocacy groups to establish a Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Development Program in Georgia. With a $652,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), UGA Extension, Georgia Organics, UGA Small Business Development Center, Fort Valley State University and AgSouth Farm Credit will develop an in-person and distance-training program for beginning farmers. The program will focus on helping these farmers build sustainable businesses as well as sustainable farms. To learn more about sustainable farming research and outreach at UGA, visit www.SustainAgGA.org.last_img read more

Health Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar

first_imgPeople continue to use apple cider vinegar as a medicine chest item useful in treating a wide variety of physical ailments.For years, senior citizens in the community and herbalists have cited the healing qualities of apple cider vinegar.Apple cider vinegar is found in supermarkets, and herbal shops and is made from pulverized apples after a period of fermentation when the apples are broken down to bacteria and yeast, turned into alcohol that ferments into vinegar holding high contents of acetic and amino acids.The proponents of the healing effects of apple cider vinegar, preferably the organic kind, recommends its consumption (usually a tablespoon in an 8 ounce glass of water two – three times daily to treat:Digestive problems like heart-burn or indigestion. (Consume the apple cider vinegar after meals).Diabetes: apple cider vinegar reduces glucose (sugar) levels (Consume a dose of the product before going to bed).High cholesterol: Consume daily apple cider vinegar reduces high levels of cholesterol.High blood pressure. Regular doses reduce high blood pressure and promotes a healthy heart.Cancer: Apple cider vinegar is said to slow the growth, and even kill cancer cells.Weight loss: the product promotes weight loss, as it is said to reduces the appetite making people feel less hungry.Health effects of the properties found in apple cider vinegar;Potassium: Aids the building of muscles, transmission of nerve impulses, heart activity, prevents brittle teeth, hair loss and nasal mucus.Acetic acid: Slows the digestion of starch, and lowers the increase of glucose in the blood.Ash (or alkaline): Helps to maintain proper pH levels in the body, which prevents and/or fight cancer cells.Malic acid: Helps to prevent the ill effects of viruses, bacteria, and fungi; removes toxins from the body, enhance bowel regularity, and promotes clean, healthy skin.Because of the acidic qualities of apple cider vinegar, it’s always recommended it’s diluted before applying it to the skin or drinking. If applied or consumed too strong it can damage the tooth enamel, tissues of the throat, mouth or skin, and have the reverse effect in the stomach.last_img read more