Umphrey’s McGee Shares Pro-Shot Footage Of TAUK’s Full Band Sit-In [Watch]

first_imgUmphrey’s McGee and TAUK ended their match made in heaven tour over the weekend, as both bands (who have spent a lot of time on the road together the last few months) will go their separate ways with the summer festival season around the corner. On Saturday night, at Dallas, TX’s House of Blues, Umphrey’s invited TAUK guitarist Matt Jalbert, bassist Charlie Dolan, keyboardist A.C. Carter, and birthday boy drummer Isaac Teel to the stage for a super groovy, funked out version of “Booth Love.” Watch UM’s pro-shot footage of the song below:Teel rejoined the band during the encore for a “Drums” solo that led into “All In Time” to end the show. You can find full show audio here.As both bands gear up for a busy summer, Umphrey’s will get back into the swing of things this weekend with a pair of shows at Minneapolis, MN venue First Avenue. Keep an eye out for the Prince bustouts in the Purple One’s hometown. TAUK will be joining Twiddle at Port Chester, NY’s The Capitol Theatre on Saturday, May 7th. More information about that show can be found here.Setlist: Umphrey’s McGee at House of Blues, Dallas, TX – 4/23/16Set 1: Lucid State > Get In The Van, All In Time > Walletsworth, Gone for Good[1], Uncle Wally[1], Utopian Fir[2] -> Walk the Proud Land[3] > Booth Love[4]Set 2: Bridgeless -> 2×2[5], Mulche’s Odyssey, Kashmir, August -> Final Word > August > BridgelessEncore: Drums[6] > All In Time[1] with Brendan and Jake on acoustics[2] with Sabbath Bloody Sabbath (Black Sabbath) jam[3] with Low Rider (War) teases[4] with Alric Carter on keyboards, Charlie Dolan and Isaac Teel on percussion, and Matt Jalbert on guitar[5] with Mind Left Body (Kanter/Garcia) jam[6] with Isaac Teel on percussionlast_img read more

Going the Distance

first_imgBen Friberg’s record-setting rideBen Friberg can look you in the eye and honestly tell you that he has lived his dreams.  Last month, Ben traveled to the Yukon Territory of Canada and set a new 24 hour stand-up paddleboarding distance world record. Ben’s fitness, combined with the power of the mighty Yukon River, propelled him 238 miles through the subarctic Northland and into the history books.  This feat is significant for many reasons, and in no small part because it puts river paddleboarding on the map. Traditionally a flatwater pastime, paddleboarding has been embraced by river adventurists, who have redefined what is possible with a board and a paddle. While Ben’s attempt was fantastically successful, it was not without its challenges. Here are Ben’s thoughts during pivotal parts of the expedition: I don’t know if I can keep this up. I did not expect this headwind and storm. As cold rain soaks my face and clothes, the support team in the boat layer up, huddle under the canopy, and sip chicken broth. At 10 miles per hour, I am making good progress, but the river is still very channelized. I know that it will slow as I get further downstream and the river braids out. I need to gain every inch possible now to have any chance at breaking the record. It is imperative that I keep my momentum.In spite of the outside conditions, my body is a metronome: heart rate, breath, paddle stroke. I have prepared for this for months, and I know what to do. Barely visible through the low-hanging rain clouds are the flanks of spectacular mountains all around. The trees are getting noticeably smaller as the river winds its way toward the desolate tundra. My vision settles just in front of the board, and in spite of the occasional words from my friends on the boat, I am alone with my thoughts and this chilling wind.I am losing precious distance every minute, with a large percentage of my output being negated by a force that seems hell-bent on pushing me backwards.“How long has it been?” I ask the support crew.“Six hours. Keep it up man, you’re doing great!”Six hours. That means I have been battling this wind for over five hours, and it is showing no sign of relenting. It’s almost midnight, but the Northland never gets completely dark in the summertime. The sun simply rotates below the horizon slightly, and rises again a few hours later. This 24-hour daylight and the power of the 100,000-cubic-feet-per-second Yukon River are two major factors that have made this attempt possible. I will never forgive myself if I allow this opportunity to slip away.As quickly as the wind and rain started, it suddenly ebbs. I clear my eyes, release my face from a squint that I have been holding, and look around. The river is rounding a sweeping left corner, and I see an ethereal alpenglow over the top of the mountains. My body’s metronome continues.As I cross out of the shadow of the mountain, a deep red sunset explodes into view, framed by the landscape of one of the most remote and dramatic areas on the planet. The river is smooth as glass, and it reflects a perfect mirror image of the crimson sky. My board slices through the red hue silently, and I realize that this moment is why I traveled 4,000 miles from home. There is no one else within a hundred miles of us, and I am chasing the sun on my board.There are certain beauties to be found in this world that render us speechless. No words can describe what we are seeing, so no one says anything. Mesmerized by the sunset, I don’t look at the support boat behind me for a long time. When I do, I notice the rainstorm behind me that I had battled for so long. In front of it is a perfect horizon-to-horizon rainbow.As the sun slowly sets and my paddle continues its rhythm, I think of everything that has gotten me to this point. I think of the first time I got on a friend’s standup board a few years ago. So much has happened since then. I think of countless hours spent on the Tennessee River near my house training, and I think of the logistical time and uncertainties that came with planning a mission of this complexity.Even though I am only a third of the way into the journey, I know that it will be successful. The river has created these conditions just for me today, and it is my job to do it justice by doing my part and pushing my body to its limits. The sun finally disappears and the hypnosis ends. As the guys in the boat pull up next to me, I can tell that they now believe too.With spirits revived, I continue paddling North.The Moment is a monthly page where we venture into the minds of inspiring outdoor enthusiasts and athletes. Submit your most powerful outdoor experiences to [email protected]last_img read more

New Tax Breaks to Spur Major New Investment by Brazil’s Defense Industry

first_imgBy Dialogo November 07, 2011 Brazil’s defense industry — the largest of any Latin American nation — could double in size over the next 10 years, thanks to a new fiscal policy proposed by President Dilma Rousseff. That policy will soon provide tax breaks to Brazilian defense manufacturers, giving them lucrative incentives to make new investments and acquisitions. As a result, thousands of new defense-related jobs are likely to be created. This initiative responds to Brazil’s national defense strategy and dovetails with the country’s industrial, technological and economic development plans. On Sep. 29, the president signed a provisional measure that exempts the defense sector from paying the industrialized products tax (IPI), the social security tax (Cofins) and the Social Integration Program tax (PIS) for five years. This could translate into savings of 30 percent for defense companies. It’s a relief for business executives who rank the tax burden along with poor infrastructure as the top impediments to growth. “These measures are important to promote the defense sector, because the industry lacks adequate conditions for domestic enterprises to compete with foreign companies inside and outside Brazil,” explained Armando Lemos, technical director for the São Paulo-based Brazilian Association of Manufacturers of Materials for Defense and Security (ABIMDE). The measure is expected to generate 23,000 direct and 90,000 indirect jobs. This would nearly double the defense sector’s current workforce of 25,000 direct and 100,000 indirect jobs, said Lemos. In all, 186 companies will benefit from the program, including industry leaders Avibras (aerospace), Embraer (aircraft), Helibras (helicopters) and Odebrecht Defesa (technology). “While the measure is still pending formal implementation, it will define the registration criteria for strategic defense companies and detail the specific tax regime that will apply to them,” said Lemos. The 2008 National Defense Strategy document, published during the presidency of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and devised by former Defense Minister Nelson Jobim, was a major milestone for Brazil’s defense establishment after years of neglect following the country’s return to democracy. One of its primary missions was to resuscitate the largely abandoned defense industry and turn it into an efficient, competitive business capable of contributing to Brazil’s international prestige and economic growth. “Brazil’s defense requires the reorganization of the national defense industry,” the document explicitly states. A guideline set forth by the report to achieve this reorganization highlights the need for independent technological capacity through international partnerships — as well as the importance of subordinating commercial considerations to so-called strategic imperatives, such as a special legal, regulatory and taxation regime for the defense industry. Since the document’s publication, technology transfer arrangements have been made between Embraer and overseas suppliers to produce the KC-390 military transport aircraft. Brazil´s cooperation with France to build four conventional submarines and one nuclear submarine also includes a similar technology transfer agreement. A key pillar of Brazil’s new strategy is to bolster its defense industry, thereby ensuring that equipment needs are met by domestic companies capable of competing in external markets. That would guarantee economies of scale for production. “Whether owing to the size of our territory or our borders, or to the fact that our country has been blessed with enormous wealth, we need this industry because it is strategic for our sovereignty,” Rousseff said following the announcement of tax breaks for the sector. The defense industry is not alone in receiving preferential treatment. Last August, Rousseff announced the Bigger Brazil Plan (Plano Brasil Maior) aimed at protecting domestic manufacturers from increased Asian competition and a rising currency. The pilot program supports the production of clothing, shoemaking, furniture and software by offering $16 billion in tax breaks to support innovation, investment, productivity, foreign trade, human capital, sustainable production, and small and medium size companies in these sectors. In essence, the plan puts homegrown innovation and value-added production at the forefront and aims to make Brazilian companies more cost-competitive globally. “We need to develop technology in Brazil in order to add even more value to our industrial production by reducing costs through tax reductions and by minimizing bureaucracy,” said Labor Party Sen. Acir Gurgacz, in arguments shortly before the plan’s passage in August. Brazilian defense companies already receive some direct financial support from the federal government. For example, Optovac, which created a uranium valve for Brazil’s future nuclear submarine, counts on resources from the São Paulo State Research Foundation as well as FINEP, an agency of the Ministry of Science and Technology. According to the 2008 National Defense Strategy, the largest industrial projects of Brazil’s armed forces will require investments of at least $40 billion. Addressing all military needs expands the total to about $120 billion, said ABIMDE’s president, Orlando José Ferreira Neto. Brazil’s ambitious goals appear achievable. In 2010, the country was Latin America’s highest defense spender at $33.5 billion, and the only one in the region to rank among the world’s top 15 spenders, according to the Swedish research center SIPRI. The new fiscal incentives will help free up even more capital for investments in this sector.last_img read more

May 15, 2004 Letters

first_img May 15, 2004 Letters Letters Diversity So, the entire Florida Bar is off on the road to diversity. Reminds me of the Bob Hope and Bing Crosby movies of comedic knights — errant on their way to some exotic location, except, of course, that Bob and Bing were a lot funnier than The Florida Bar, and had a better idea of where they were going.The Florida Bar leadership has been in lock-step, tooting its diversity horns and banging its diversity drums for the last 20 years, and the parade has gone nowhere. So, that having failed, they have resolved to try more of the same without even remotely considering whether the underlying premise of their errant efforts is sound. Their underlying premise is that somewhere “out there” there is a vast, untapped pool of “incredibly talented” minorities who are all just dying to become lawyers, except that racism, sexism, homophobia, or some other sort of politically incorrect barrier is thwarting their upward ascendancy to the land of esquiredom and billable hours. The removal of those barriers will open the floodgates to a true egalitarian society where what you do is a lot less important than how you appear to the person viewing you; if you look like each other, justice has been achieved.Would any sane person agitate for a society whose members had to be divided up into racial and gender groupings, and then equally distributed among every trade and profession according to the ratio between any such group and the general population? “I’m sorry little boy/girl, you can’t be an astronaut, we need 3.25 percent more left-handed, Latino lathe-operators to make our society just. Get along to shop class, now.” Sound just a little Orwellian?The simple fact is that there is no such vast pool of legal talent “out there,” anymore than there is a vast pool of potential physicists, chemists, engineers, physicians, accountants, architects, or any other professionals, “out there.” Why does The Florida Bar think differently about the availability of legal talent? Because, it will tell you, lawyers and the law are different. Lawyers and the law are the natural born leaders of society and all its institutions. Only we make a difference, only we can change this pathetic society into something grander, and only we have the vision and judgment to discern grandeur. A cursory glance at the next billboard bearing lawyer advertising should dispel that poppycock.You politically correct “leaders” have it backward. Diversity does not need to be achieved; it is already here and has been since the Twelve Tribes split up. It is not by achieving but by overcoming diversity that progress toward a “juster” society is made. When diverse peoples who recognize the legitimacy of different cultures and values nonetheless come together to achieve a common goal, understanding is reached, respect is earned, and progress is made. When we, by our deeds, return the legal profession to a position of respectability in our society, more kids of every race, creed, and culture may, just may, want to become lawyers. There’s your talent pool. Michael H. Davidson TallahasseeThe Florida Bar Board of Governors apparently doesn’t understand the loss of credibility to reputation by its unimaginative methods for involving women and blacks in this law group. Witness the reported selection process for identifying finalists for a public member seat being vacated by a black woman. Three white males, including a man of Hispanic origin, were deemed to be the best qualified for the position. But what were the qualifications?The Bar News described the three as follows: one approaching my near retirement age is an executive in a title company and bank. Another has extensive government and business experience in Canada, and the third is a native of Cuba who owns a court reporting service and serves on a local grievance committee. Those certainly are formidable qualifications, but for what exactly?I wonder which of them is qualified to address the issue of representation of children so near and dear to the heart of the current Bar president? Which of these white men can address issues of racism and gender bias which arise on occasion or even more often in local courts throughout the state? Which has any experience in hiring and retention of blacks who make up a meager 2 percent of the Bar’s membership? The comparable population in the state exceeds 12 percent.As for the self-congratulatory but failed efforts of board members to “recruit minorities and women into Bar leadership positions on committees and commissions,” the historically and predominantly white males on the board seem unwilling to consider that a hard time is had by all because its own professional makeup reflects adversely on the effort. Simply put, more qualified minorities and women might be attracted if there were more qualified minorities and women on the board to attract them. The new qualified public member does not meet that qualification.But we know Floridians can do the right thing, if pushed to do so. A recent cover of Florida Trend magazine reflects a success story in the Florida Blue Key leadership, an organization in which white males reigned exclusive and supreme years after women and blacks were accepted into the University of Florida, the base of its operations. In the ’70s and ’80s, years after others were doing so, FBK gave grudging if token admission to women and minorities. But it took a major scandal in Gainesville to wake up the university. This year the FBK leadership is all female. Can minorities be far behind?In my younger days. I actually wasted five years of time and money to persuade Florida Bar members who sit as judges that I should not be made to associate with its ilk, in light of historic intolerance to discrete minorities. Older if not wiser 15 years later, I still stand apart from the board’s members who wonder why their Southern charm doesn’t attract, say, people who are not like them. But I smile when I think how little the board has changed despite evidence of increasing diversity elsewhere in Florida.So keep going. Waste your time and money. I no longer care. After all, since the 2000 presidential election, some of us have many more important things on our minds. Gabe Kaimowitz Gainesville May 15, 2004 Letterslast_img read more

Guyanese charged with falsifying US passport application

first_imgA federal grand jury returned an indictment charging Joseph Fedrick, 42, of Guyana, with falsifying an application for a United States passport, US Attorney William J Ihlenfeld II, announced.Fedrick executed an application for a United States passport in Berkeley County, West Virginia. Within the application, Fedrick attempted to use a false social security number with the intent to secure the passport fraudulently.Fedrick is charged with one count of “False Statement in Application for Passport.” He faces up to 10 years in prison and up to 0,000 in fines. Under the Federal Sentencing guidelines, the actual sentence imposed will be based upon the seriousness of the offences and the prior criminal history, if any, of the defendant.Assistant US Attorney Shawn M Adkins is prosecuting the case on behalf of the Government. The Department of the State Diplomatic Security Service and the United States Department of Homeland Security are investigating.An indictment is merely an accusation. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty. (US Department of Justice)last_img read more