Umphrey’s McGee Will Webcast Their Three-Night Run In Philadelphia

first_imgProgressive jam masters Umphrey’s McGee are gearing up for a sure-to-be-special three-night run at the Fillmore in Philadelphia, PA, and they want you to be able to experience the rock show from the comforts of your own home. The band have just announced that all three nights will be available for on-demand streaming courtesy of TourGigs. Each show will be available for purchase in HD and with soundboard audio.Each night costs $12.99, or you can purchase a bundle of all three nights for $34.99. All purchasers will be able to re-watch the shows for a full seven days, giving any Umphrey’s fan across the country the opportunity to take place in these shows, at their own leisure. Click here for more info on how to purchase the webcasts.last_img

Sustainable Agriculture

first_img“Having the Georgia Organics conference here allows us to highlight all the research and Extension work we have in this area,” she said. During the two-day conference, UGA faculty hosted farm tours at UGArden, the organic farm at Durham Horticulture Farm and at the J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center—UGA’s hub for sustainable agriculture research and public outreach. They also hosted hands-on workshops. Pioneers in sustainable agriculture, backyard gardeners and urban homesteaders gathered in Athens this month to share knowledge gathered over years of working the land and to learn new skills from researchers at the University of Georgia. From soil health research to breeding programs for organically produced crops, faculty and staff at UGA have worked to improve the sustainability and efficiency of organic farms in Georgia. “Many people don’t realize how much work we have going on in sustainable agriculture,” said Julia Gaskin, sustainable agriculture coordinator for the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) and winner of Georgia Organics’ 2015 Land Steward Award. Lawton Stewart, assistant professor of animal and dairy science, and Dennis Hancock, associate professor of crop and soil sciences, taught an introductory workshop on sustainable grazing. David Berle, associate professor of horticulture, and JoHannah Biang, UGArden farm manager, taught a class of beginning farmers and gardeners how to build raised beds and how to repair and use small farm machinery. Peter Hartel, retired professor of crop and soil sciences, and Elizabeth Little, assistant professor in plant pathology, helped farmers inspect soil from their farms using microscopes and interpret findings in terms of soil health. Suzanne Stone, a graduate student in horticulture, and Little, assistant professor of plant pathology, helped lead a discussion on the need for better crop varieties for organic producers. Gaskin and George Boyhan, professor of horticulture, gave a workshop on selecting cover crops and how to maximize their benefit.Judy Harrison, professor of foods and nutrition in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, gave updated conference attendees on the Food Safety and Modernization Act and how it affects produce coming from small farms.Bob Waldorf, an Extension coordinator in Banks County, gave an update on UGA’s Master Goat Farmer program. In addition to the tours and workshops, 12 UGA graduate students presented posters on their research at the conference. “You can’t have a conversation about agriculture in Georgia without involving the University of Georgia,” said Alice Rolls, executive director of Georgia Organics. “Agriculture and UGA are synonymous here, and growers of all sizes and types depend on UGA’s research and leadership.” “Without UGA, Georgia Organics’ work and farming in general would be so much more difficult, and that’s why we are grateful to count the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences as an ally in our work to put more Georgia food on Georgia tables,” Rolls added. This most recent Georgia Organics conference is just the latest collaboration between Georgia Organics and the faculty of CAES and UGA Extension. In addition to working on numerous educational programs over the years, Georgia Organics recently collaborated with UGA and several other agricultural advocacy groups to establish a Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Development Program in Georgia. With a $652,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), UGA Extension, Georgia Organics, UGA Small Business Development Center, Fort Valley State University and AgSouth Farm Credit will develop an in-person and distance-training program for beginning farmers. The program will focus on helping these farmers build sustainable businesses as well as sustainable farms. To learn more about sustainable farming research and outreach at UGA, visit www.SustainAgGA.org.last_img read more

Japan fans hail Hong Kong ‘Goddess of Democracy’ Chow

first_imgShe has been dubbed the “Goddess of Democracy” and found fans among politicians and actors. There is little doubt that Hong Kong activist Agnes Chow is big in Japan.The 23-year-old’s arrest this week was headline news and lit up social media in Japan, far eclipsing the detention of other high-profile figures under Hong Kong’s new national security law.Media-savvy, telegenic and fluent in Japanese to boot, Chow has managed to cut through the relative apathy with which foreign affairs are sometimes regarded in Japan, winning unprecedented attention for Beijing’s crackdown on her home city. Twitter, tunes and takoyaki Chow’s popularity in Japan stems in large part from a savvy campaign directed at the country, which includes running a Japanese-language Twitter account with more than 470,000 followers and appearing in Japanese media.Her language skills have given her rare unmediated access to the Japanese public, and she has endeared herself to many with her love of anime and J-pop music.Chow was released on bail on Tuesday, and told reporters — in Japanese — that the song “Fukyowaon” by J-pop group Keyakizaka46 was playing in her head while she was detained.She also paid tribute to the support she received from Japan, saying in a YouTube live stream that she “felt Japanese people were cheering for her during the arrest”.Chow is also a fan of Japanese food, even sharing pictures of her failed attempts at the popular octopus ball dish takoyaki.Last year, she made Forbes Japan’s list of the 50 most influential social media accounts in the country, alongside a group of mostly Japanese celebrities and public figures.For all her popularity, it is unclear if Chow has had much influence on Japanese government policy.Chief spokesman Yoshihide Suga has made no specific comment on her arrest, though the government has expressed more general concern over the application of the national security law, which outlaws subversion, terrorism and foreign collusion in the semi-autonomous city.Japan had been in the process of rehabilitating ties with Beijing, with Chinese President Xi Jinping previously scheduled to make a state visit this year to cement the warming relations.But the visit has been delayed, seemingly indefinitely, and while the government has blamed the coronavirus pandemic for the decision, there has been growing discomfort among some Japanese lawmakers about the country’s relationship with Beijing. Topics :center_img After her arrest this week, the Japanese hashtags “#FreeAgnes” and “#I protest against the arrest of Agnes Chow” quickly went viral, with public figures from across the country’s political spectrum, as well as writers and actors, tweeting their support.Veteran ruling party lawmaker Akihisa Nagashima posted a string of tweets on the arrest, saying Chow had “spent her entire youth for the freedom and democracy of Hong Kong”.Opposition lawmaker Renho, who uses one name, actress Sayaka Akimoto and sports writer Hirotada Ototake were among others who hailed the activist and condemned her arrest.”She’s young but she’s brave,” one Twitter user wrote, with many praising Chow’s Japanese language ability.last_img read more

Eni adds acreage offshore Argentina to its portfolio

first_imgThe Argentinian authorities have officially awarded the exploration license of offshore block MLO 124 to an Eni-led consortium.Eni said on Monday that the award is the outcome of the consortium’s successful bid in the International Bid Round “Ronda Costa Afuera n. 1” held on April 16, 2019.A total of 38 blocks were on offer in the licensing round, the first open bid round for Argentinean offshore acreage in more than 20 years.Block MLO 124 is located offshore in the Cuenca Marina Malvinas (the Malvinas Basin), some 100 kilometers off the coast of Tierra del Fuego, and encompasses an area of 4,418 square kilometers in water depths ranging from less than 100 to 650 meters.Eni holds 80% working interest and is the operator of a consortium, which also includes Tecpetrol S.A. and Mitsui & Co. Ltd., with 10% each.The activity to be completed during the four years of the First Phase of the Exploration Period mainly consists in a 3D geophysical survey covering the entire block and other geophysical potential field surveys.Eni has been present in Argentina since 1991 with its subsidiary Eni Argentina Exploración y Explotación S.A., which owns a 30% working interest in the offshore concession “Tauro-Sirius”, located in Tierra del Fuego’s shallow water.It is worth reminding that ExxonMobil increased holdings in Argentina after its subsidiary ExxonMobil Argentina Offshore Investments and an affiliate of Qatar Petroleum won three exploration blocks during Argentina’s first offshore bid round. The award added approximately 2.6 million net acres to its existing holdings in Argentina. ExxonMobil was named the operator of the blocks with a 70 percent working interest and a Qatar Petroleum affiliate was awarded the remaining 30 percent.Furthermore, Norwegian Equinor added seven offshore exploration blocks in Argentina to its portfolio – five as the operator and two as a partner – as part of the country’s first Offshore Licensing Round.Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Offshore Energy Today, established in 2010, is read by over 10,000 industry professionals daily. We had nearly 9 million page views in 2018, with 2.4 million new users. This makes us one of the world’s most attractive online platforms in the space of offshore oil and gas and allows our partners to get maximum exposure for their online campaigns. If you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today contact our marketing manager Mirza Duran for advertising options.last_img read more

Bowlers put England  on top in second Test

first_imgJAMES Anderson repaid England’s faith, doing all he could to demonstrate he was back in rhythm even if a rain-hampered opening day of the second Test against Pakistan  at the Ageas Bowl was far more erratic.Anderson’s two wickets on a day when a heatwave-breaking storm allowed only 45.4 overs helped England close in a comfortable position after a frustrating start, caused by their own poor fielding rather than the weather.Anderson played the role of starved attack dog to perfection, snaring a wicket with his eighth ball of the match to remove Shan Masood for a seventh time in five Tests. Masood top-scored in a losing cause for Pakistan at Old Trafford, while Anderson had a torrid time with match figures of 1 for 97, which he said left him hungry for wickets to put things right.England believed Anderson, their veteran seamer who is now just eight away from claiming 600 career Test wickets, deserved every opportunity to do so and he was effectively the first name on the team sheet if Joe Root’s pre-match comments were anything to go by.He responded almost immediately with a curving inswinger that left Masood with no alternative but to lay bat on ball and, when he failed, he was out plumb lbw for just 1.A tough period for England ensued as the bowlers beat the outside edge several times for no reward and, worse, watched two chances go down in the slips cordon and another couple of near misses.With Pakistan having won the toss, opener Abid Ali received two lives, first on 1 when he was dropped by Dom Sibley at third slip off the bowling of Stuart Broad, and then on 21 when Rory Burns made a meal of a juggled catch at second.Sam Curran, in the side for a resting Jofra Archer but also to bolster England’s batting in the absence of Ben Stokes, almost had Azhar Ali out for 11 but the edge failed to carry to Root at first slip.After rain brought an early lunch, Anderson then lured Azhar, unbeaten on 20, into an extravagant drive, and appeared to find an edge for caught behind but England declined to review. When replays indicated a small spike on UltraEdge, it looked like another opportunity lost.Azhar and Abid put on 72 runs together but their luck finally ran out. Anderson broke through when Burns held on to an edge and Azhar departed for 20, extending a lean run for the Pakistan captain who has managed just one score of note – a century against Sri Lanka – in 17 innings since late December 2018.The storm that was expected to end southern England’s week-long swelter duly arrived and play was held up for 80 minutes with Abid stranded on 49. He brought up his fifty shortly after the resumption with an edge off Anderson that pierced the cordon and went for two.Curran removed Abid for 60 with an excellent ball that jagged away after shaping into the batsman and found a thick edge, again snapped up by Burns.As if to prove he was well and truly back, Anderson put his 38-year-old body on the line to stop Babar Azam’s drive off good mate Broad, diving to his left at mid-on. Broad bowled very well and and claimed his reward when he had Asad Shafiq caught low by a bending, relieved Sibley at third slip.Shafiq’s departure brought Fawad Alam to the crease for the first time in a Test since 2009. But his long-awaited return was so very short-lived when he fell for a four-ball duck, lbw to Chris Woakes via the DRS after umpire Richard Kettleborough gave him not out but Hawk-Eye showed that the ball, which pitched just on leg stump, was going on to strike the top of middle.Fewer than two overs followed with Azam not out 25 and Mohammad Rizwan on 4 when the rain returned and bad light ultimately brought about stumps with half the overs for the day bowled.(ESPN Cricinfo)last_img read more

Environmental agency to decide fate of Costa Ricas Moín Port expansion

first_imgRelated posts:Court rejects final appeal against Moín Port expansion; construction to start within 2 months UPDATE: Atlantic ports paralyzed after dockworkers go on ‘indefinite’ strike Solís administration, striking dockworkers at loggerheads over port concession APM Terminals set to begin construction in 2015 on $1 billion Costa Rica port after environmental study approved MOÍN, Limón – Costa Rica’s largest infrastructure project, the $992 million Moín Port expansion on the northern Caribbean coast, is still stuck on the starting blocks awaiting approval of an environmental impact assessment.The National Technical Secretariat of the Environment Ministry (SETENA) has reviewed the entire 3,000-page report issued by port authorities and is now in the last stage of collecting additional information from experts. But the lengthy process has already delayed construction, originally slated to begin in September.“This is the largest project SETENA, in its entire 10 years, has ever reviewed,” Uriel Juárez, SETENA’s secretary general, told The Tico Times. “We have a great responsibility to make sure that the answer we give is the right one, and that takes time.”Although executives with the port’s builder and management company, APM Terminals, are optimistic the project will move forward, environmental activists have issued reports of their own, urging SETENA to reject the environmental permit.If those efforts fail, construction would begin in February with SETENA’s approval. The project would expand and update Costa Rica’s main Caribbean port, enabling it to receive the giant post-Panamax ships that can hold up to 12,000 containers at a time.Environmental approval is the last potential stumbling block for the 33-year concession to APM Terminals. The Dutch company has already swatted away lawsuits from the unions, with the courts rejecting two cases in August of last year. Though the unions have appealed, the more imminent threat now comes from a coalition of three environmentalists.“This is an extremely complicated project environmentally,” Mauricio Álvarez, an opponent of port expansion, told The Tico Times. “The report presented does not consider other scenarios in other surrounding areas.”Álvarez, president of Costa Rica’s Ecologist Federation (FECON), along with Álvaro Sagot, a well-known environmental lawyer, and Allan Astorga, an environmental consultant, presented a petition to SETENA in September highlighting 27 points of the port’s environmental evaluation that they say violate regulations.According to the environmentalists, APM Terminal’s environmental impact report has shortcomings that violate Costa Rican laws. For Sagot, the most glaring threats include the potential contamination of a nearby aqueduct, damage to wetlands from the construction of an access road and prolonged or permanent pollution.Paul Gallie, managing director of APM Terminals Moín, told The Tico Times he is confident the expansion complies with Costa Rica’s environmental standards.“We have no intention of damaging the environment. We always uphold local standards,” he said. “All projects affect the environment, but with the inefficiency in the current port – trucks waiting, ships waiting, ships with inefficient engines – at the end of the day [our] project improves the environment.”If SETENA approves APM Terminal’s original report, Sagot says his group will take legal action through the Constitutional Chamber of the Supreme Court (Sala IV).Though it has met challenges from unions and environmentalists, the port’s expansion is widely supported by both politicians and development groups eager to solve the economic woes of Limón, the country’s poorest province.The port’s construction will create 400-700 direct jobs, and another 400 people will be needed to operate the port in its initial stages. Some 300 additional jobs will be added over time. APM Terminals also estimates that at least 5,000 indirect jobs will be created.“More important than the direct jobs is that a modern, deep port provides huge confidence for foreign and local investment,” Gallie said. “If Costa Rica does not remain competitive in the international market, people will go elsewhere.”Failure to update its infrastructure has left Costa Rica struggling in terms of development in the region. According to the World Economic Forum’s 2012-2013 report, Costa Rica ranks 140th of 144 countries in port infrastructure, putting it behind several landlocked countries. Unreliable shipping could play a role in whether or not companies choose to invest here.Still, in a province with both the highest unemployment and murder rates in the country, community leaders warn that the port is not a catchall solution.“What we really need is investment. It’s not enough to just build a port,” Pablo Castillo, president of Limón’s Chamber of Commerce, Tourism and Industry, told The Tico Times. “We need all sorts of development, but the port is a start.”And it’s a start that Costa Rican President Laura Chinchilla is eager to see get started. The president has been not-so-subtly hurrying SETENA along, calling the organization “an enormous bottleneck in many of the country’s development projects,” during a visit to Limón in August.The political pressure is alarming to Sagot and other environmentalists who believe that it could affect SETENA’s decision.“The government is hurrying it along when it is none of their concern,” Sagot said, of the port project. “SETENA is a technical entity. This is technical decision, not a political one.”But the final step in SETENA’s process will be neither technical nor political. Once the entire environmental report is finished and analyzed, the potential environmental risks will be presented to the community in a public hearing, which Juárez is expecting to happen in November. Though it is unlikely that the hearing could sway SETENA’s final decision, it could lead to additional environmental restrictions and delay the process further.“We need development but we are going to protect our values,” Castillo said. “We are Costa Rica, we are an environmental country, that is who we are.” Facebook Commentslast_img read more