Atlanta Theater To Pay Tribute To Col. Bruce Hampton With Special Double Feature

first_imgNext Monday, the Lefont Film Society will honor the life of Atlanta’s late Col. Bruce Hampton, whose sudden departure from this world at his 70th birthday party, Hampton 70, on May 1st sent shockwaves across our music community and beyond. To celebrate his life, on May 15th, the Lefont Theater—Roswell Road in Atlanta will host a double screening of movies featuring the Colonel.Stranger Than Fiction: The Cosmic Curtain Call Of Col. Bruce HamptonCalled A Movies & Music Big Screen Celebration Of Life And Tribute To Col. Bruce Hampton, the two movies screened will be Michael Koepenick’s  2012 documentary Basically Frightened, which examines the life of the eccentric legendary musician, and Phish bassist Mike Gordon’s absurd 2000 film, Outside Out, which stars Col. Bruce and pokes fun at instructional videos for musicians. Following the two films, Basically Frightened‘s director, Michael Koepenick will answer questions from the audience.Full Audio From “Hampton 70: A Celebration Of Col. Bruce Hampton” Is HereA Movies & Music Big Screen Celebration Of Life And Tribute To Col. Bruce Hampton plans on honoring the Col. in one other way. The event, channeling the eccentricities of the late musical legend, is scheduled to start exactly at 7:06 p.m. on the dot, with tickets being sold for $14.46 here.last_img read more

Will the ‘Internet of Things’ open your home to hackers?

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Jason GlassbergAt this week’s RSA Conference in San Francisco, the world’s leading cyber minds aren’t just focusing on international super-hackers and possible future attacks on the electric grid. Do you know what else they’re worrying about?Your home.With the explosion of “Internet of Things” products, devices, appliances and machinery (Gartner predicts 4.9 million “connected things” this year), everything from Amazon’s cute little “Dash” buttons to “smart” toilets, self-diagnosing refrigerators and self-driving cars, there is growing concern that this rush of technological sophistication and convenience could also have dire consequences for personal security.After all, security often appears to be the last thing manufacturers think about when rushing these tricked-out products to market. In many cases, they lack safeguards to prevent even basic attacks. Take for instance, the baby monitor hacks in Washington, Texas and Minnesota, or the keyless door lock break-ins at Arizona hotels, the key fob car hacks across the U.S. and a variety of other threats demonstrated at hacker conferences, from Barnaby Jack’s insulin pump attack to Charlie Miller’s hijack of a car’s steering and breaking systems.Of course, many of the most talked about (i.e., hyped) threats are the least likely to affect the average person, but they do raise some serious questions. In the race to win over our living rooms, are businesses leaving the front door open? continue reading »last_img read more

Lystek truck traffic would be a danger

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionSince December, it has been consistently reported that the facility proposed for the town of Glen by the Canadian sewage waste-to-fertilizer company Lystek would result in the addition of 10 to 20 trucks per day to our community’s local traffic.I have lived just west of the Riverside Drive/Route 5S intersection for 40-plus years, and “only” 10 to 20 trucks a day has me concerned for the safety on that intersection.One concern is the potential for more accidents. Heavily loaded trucks heading to the facility in the Glen Canal View Business Park will make an uphill turn very slowly onto a 55 mph state highway, Route 5S. Cars coming from the east can’t see the trucks until they crest the top of the hill. At that point, they are traveling the speed limit, which would make it very difficult to avoid an accident.Another major concern is that these trucks will be hauling untreated sewage sludge – which by Lystek’s own documentation can contain significant pathogens, contaminants and heavy metals that would then be reduced or diluted to “lower than the legal limits.” Also, per Lystek’s own documentation, a number of these trucks use only simple tarps to cover the “material.”Conservatively, “10 trucks a day, five days a week” calculates to 5,200 passes annually (there and back) – half of them being trucks loaded with sewage sludge. If you use their full estimates of 20 trucks per day, at 365 days, it becomes 14,600 truck passes. Keeping count, that’s 2,600 to 7,300 sewage sludge-filled trucks arriving and departing the Business Park each year. That’s a different picture from “only” 10 to 20 trucks!George Galeazza FultonvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Feds: Painting stolen by Nazis and found at Arkell Museum returned to familylast_img read more

Maloney magic wins it for Scotland

first_img In the 34th minute Mulgrew bulleted a header from a Maloney cross past the post from six yards as Scotland turned the screw and the home fans at last found their voice. Four minutes from the break Fletcher failed to get on the end of a Maloney cross after the former Celt delightfully pulled a Russell Martin pass out of the air, and another opportunity for Scotland was lost. O’Neill’s side came out for the second-half in a more purposeful mode and in the 50th minute, from a fine McGeady cross, Hanley did well to challenge Walters and concede a corner which came to nothing. Moments later, from another Irish corner, Walters’ flick was helped on by Long from close-range with the home fans palpably relieved to see Marshall make the save. Fletcher was replaced by Chris Martin but Marshall again came to Scotland’s rescue by pushing an angled-drive by McGeady past the far post for another James McClean corner, which he confidently plucked out the air. In the 65th minute, with the game tantalisingly balanced and not for those of a nervous disposition, Martin screwed a Steven Naismith pass inches past Forde’s left-hand post from eight yards out. Long and Darron Gibson were soon replaced by Robbie Brady and Stephen Quinn in a double substitution but to no avail. From a whipped-in free-kick from Mulgrew, Walters headed the ball against the top of his own crossbar but the luck of the Irish immediately went missing. Maloney took a short corner to skipper Scott Brown, took the clever return pass and curled the ball from 16 yards past Forde and into the far corner and Parkhead erupted. O’Neill threw on Keane for Hendrick and the Scots were forced into some desperate defending but saw out four additional minutes – in which the ball came off their bar in a last-ditch Irish attack – to the cheers of the home fans who may already have the scent of France in their nostrils. Scotland go level on seven points with Ireland and Germany, with Poland Group D leaders with 10, but there are surely twists and turns still to come before the two automatic qualifying spots and the play-off place is secured. There had been plenty of guess work about personnel in an intense build-up to the game and the Scotland team sheet showed that Strachan, back at his former club, made three changes with left-back Andy Robertson, stopper Grant Hanley and midfielder Charlie Mulgrew returning as Steven Whittaker moved to right-back. Irish manager Martin O’Neill, another ex-Celtic boss, lost midfielders Glenn Whelan and James McCarthy to injury but the shock news was that skipper and top scorer Robbie Keane had been dropped to the bench. Republic fans had been officially allocated around 3,200 tickets but there were a few thousand more Irish accents in the ground at kick-off time, helping create quite a din, albeit it took quite a while for the stadium to fill up to almost its 60,000 capacity. Amid a cracking atmosphere the question of whether Republic of Ireland’s Scots-born winger Aiden McGeady would get booed on his return to his old ground was answered in the affirmative by the Tartan Army, who never let up. However, there was more for them to focus on in a frantic opening as Scotland keeper David Marshall was tested by Jon Walters before Scots striker Steven Fletcher headed a Maloney corner over the bar. A tetchiness then enveloped the match. In the 12th minute Hanley was booked by Serbian referee Milorad Mazic for a desperate tackle on Shane Long and then McGeady and Jeff Hendrick were shown yellows for fouls on Fletcher and Whittaker respectively. Gordon Strachan’s side had the best of a tense, frenetic first-half at Celtic Park but passed up a couple of good chances to take the lead. The visitors came out rejuvenated after the break however Scotland regained control with Wigan forward Maloney, back on his old stomping ground, curling the ball past David Forde in the 75th minute with technique fit to win any game. Scotland confirmed their 2016 European Championship qualifying credentials with a hard-fought 1-0 win over Republic of Ireland thanks to a wonderful second-half strike by Shaun Maloney Press Associationlast_img read more