Robert Randolph, BIG Something & More Rock Blunderbuss [Audio/Gallery/Review]

first_imgLoad remaining images Heavy Seas brought together good music and good beer on Saturday at Blunderbuss Music Festival in Baltimore. The one-day fest boasted a fun lineup loaded with hometown heroes. With low ticket prices and a high concentration of talent, Blunderbuss is likely one of the higher bangs-for-buck this summer.Sweet Leda started things off for the early risers with local favorite, Ron Holloway joining them on the sax. They played a new single, “Make it Happen,” off their upcoming album and have a slew of shows coming up around Maryland this summer.Next up was another hometown crew, Cris Jacobs Band, the solo project of The Bridge frontman. Jacobs has a new album in the works which will be out this fall and has been debuting bits and pieces of it at shows in the area.BIG Something brought the dance jams in the late, hot afternoon. The six-man heavy rocking funk band will be making appearances at festivals all over the country this summer.BoomBox continued the dance party in the early evening. These two never disappoint, with smooth lyrics and full jams. The pair will be heading out west until late July, when they come back to the East coast for F.A.R.M. Fest.Baltimore’s own, Robert Randolph & the Family Band headlined the night, bringing the fest to a high-energy ending with fans dancing on stage and multiple encores as the sun went down. The family is off to G Fest and FIBARK Festival this upcoming weekend.Blunderbuss was the second festival put on by Heavy Seas in Baltimore, and the largest one to take place at the harbor this summer. You can check out a few soundboard recordings and a gallery from taper Will Urquhart below.BoomBoxBIG SomethingCris Jacobs Band: last_img read more

Game weekend features lectures

first_imgAs a lead-up to this weekend’s Shamrock Series football game against the Miami Hurricanes in Chicago, the University will host four academic events in the Windy City that focus on various key issues in today’s world. The events, which are free and open to the public, will be held at Chicago’s J.W. Marriott at 151 W. Adams Street. Sophomore Emily Strickland, student advocacy assistant for the Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity, said the scheduled academic talks emphasize the values important to the University. “I think it’s highlighting that Notre Dame is an academic institution first rather than a sports powerhouse,” Strickland said. As part of the series, the Ford Program, along with the Kellogg Institute for International Studies and the Initiative for Global Development, is sponsoring a debate titled “International Development and U.S. Foreign Policy,” which will be held today at 5 p.m. in Grand Ballroom B and C. The debate will feature two panelists: Paul Collier, development economist and the director for the Center for the Study of African Economies at the University of Oxford, and Sean Callahan, executive vice president of Overseas Operations at Catholic Relief Services. Collier gave a lecture at the University on Wednesday night, titled “International Human Development: Has the U.S. a Leadership Role?” In the Chicago debate, Collier and Callahan will discuss what the U.S. role in international development should be, Strickland said. The Kellogg Institute will stream a live feed of the event on its website. “They’re going to talk about what factors are relevant in policy making, and how they should be implemented,” Strickland said. This topic will play a significant role in November’s presidential election, Strickland said, and today’s event will give students a chance to learn more about the different approaches to global development. “It’s preparing students to see how they should vote, what they feel and to develop their own opinions about foreign aid,” she said. At 2 p.m. today, the University will host another panel, titled “Notre Dame Faculty in the Media.” The event, which will also be held in Grand Ballroom B and C, will feature Notre Dame faculty panelists who been heavily involved in print, broadcast or online news media, a Notre Dame press release stated. Kate Sullivan, Notre Dame class of 1998 and CBS Chicago news anchor, will moderate the panel. Friday’s academic events, which will both be held in the Lincoln Room of the J.W. Marriott, will focus on economy and politics in today’s world. “The Economy Now: A Roundtable of Notre Dame Economists” will take place at 10 a.m. and will feature a discussion by Notre Dame faculty and a question-and-answer period. The final academic event of the Shamrock Series is hosted by University Communications at 2 p.m. Friday. David Shribman, executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, will moderate “Religion in the Public Square,” and its panelists include University professors and members of the news media. The week’s events offer Notre Dame alumni and fans a chance to stay involved with the University through avenues besides sports, Strickland said. “Notre Dame is a University, it’s not going to be all about sports,” she said. “I think it’s showing that athletics are important, but academics always comes with it at the University.” For a complete listing of this weekend’s events in Chicago, visit gameday.nd.edu.last_img read more

Jenna Augen on Her High-Octane Turn in London’s Bad Jews

first_imgBreakout performances rarely come as high-voltage as Jenna Augen’s turn in Bad Jews, the Joshua Harmon play that is transferring to the Arts Theatre starting March 18 after previous runs both at the St. James Theatre and out of town in Bath. Inheriting Tracee Chimo’s New York role, Augen puts her own spiky, sparky spin on the religious Daphna, who comes to grief with her assimilationist cousin Liam (Ilan Goodman) over the fate of a family heirloom. The immediately warm Augen chatted to Broadway.com on the eve both of the play’s West End upgrade and of turning 30 about defending a tricky character, making it overseas, and being ready for whatever happens. You have a base in L.A.—is this third run of Bad Jews making you reassess where you want to focus your career? Now it just seems as if there are many more possibilities in terms of staying here. When I left almost two years ago now, my prospects here felt very limited but now it looks as if there are options. I do have a life out in L.A. now and would love somehow to get a proper career going there as well as here, so I’m not sure how that bridge is going to be built. Daphna is such a high-octane presence. Is it hard to leave her behind every night? I do find it difficult to shed her skin because her rhythms are so total. She’s so aggressive and her energy level is at such a high voltage that I have a really hard time coming down off it; I get completely exhausted. The last couple of weeks at the St. James we had 9-show weeks so two days of back-to-back shows. At the end of those, I didn’t know which end was up! [Laughs.] You and Ilan Goodman are so well-matched that the play’s various debates deliver big-time. Well, Ilan’s amazing, without which I wouldn’t be able to do what I do, but also the writing for the two characters is so perfectly paralleled and Liam’s rant has exactly the same thought patterns as Daphna’s; they’re on one wavelength, [but] the two sides of a single coin. And while they dislike each other and tick each other off, they on some level enjoy having that other person kicking off in the room: you’ve got to have some enjoyment in what they do on stage. Daphna is so quick-witted, yet volatile. Do you enjoy playing such a vibrant character? I wasn’t ready to say goodbye to her at the St. James; I think we were all finding things every single week. It only really hit me towards the end of the run just how strong her sense of injustice is about the fact that her cousin Liam has really stolen the chai [the Hebraic heirloom belonging to their late grandfather]. It was taken off this elderly man who was lying comatose in the hospital, so no wonder it remains a hot-button issue when Daphna and Liam meet. The title of the play is an eye-opener with its suggestion that there are different kinds of Jews. Do you relate to that thematic? Well, my mother is a non-Jewish opera singer so I’m the product of the kind of situation that Liam has in the play with Melody [his non-Jewish girlfriend, who studied opera]. My dad is Jewish: he’s a molecular biologist and also genuine supporter and appreciator of the arts, and I’ve always felt very lucky to be my parents’ daughter. But there are spooky coincidences between my own life and what is in the script. When I first read it, I went, “Whoa, this is strange!” So you’re open to whatever happens? I am—I have to go where the wind takes me. You never know what’s next in this business but for now I’m just so glad to be having this job, and doing this play, for the third time.center_img Did you see the play during either of its two off-Broadway runs? I hadn’t, but I’d heard such wonderful things about it, and the original Liam [Michael Zegen] from the New York production happened to be in London and he came to see us, which was nice; it was really exciting to feel as if we were part of this trans-Atlantic team. You’re the only American in the four-person cast. Does that feel weird? Not at all. I went to [the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art] here and was often the only American being British in plays, so the fact of being the odd person out doesn’t feel strange to me. What’s good, I think, is that the accents in our show are pretty great and because I’m there, if anybody has a question about anything, they can just ask. The Arts Theatre marks your third run of Bad Jews—how does that feel? I’m so lucky. I was so happy to get this job in the first place. It was a long shot because I had been out of the country for a couple of years so it was just really nice to get the job. Then to be so well-received in Bath—where there are no Jewish people [laughs]—and at the St. James was incredibly exciting. I started crying when [co-star] Ilan [Goodman] came and told me this transfer was a possibility. As long as your American accent hasn’t been too tempered by time abroad! I know, right? We had a great dialect coach who caught me up on some stuff and here I was thinking, “Wait a minute, I’m from Connecticut,” and he said, “No, you’ve got a few Canadian sounds in your speech”—that’s what I get for spending so much time in England [laughs]. View Commentslast_img read more

Parkway Views and Trails Protected

first_imgA critical 10-acre parcel of land along the Blue Ridge Parkway was recently purchased by the Conservation Trust for North Carolina. The Fork Ridge Overlook land protects a newly opened section of the Mountains to Sea Trail between mile markers 449 and 450. It also ensures that nearby development does not encroach on the trail or the viewshed from the Blue Ridge Parkway.The 10-acre parcel was purchased for $43,000 from landowners in San Francisco who agreed to a dramatically below-market-value price. The Conservation Trust for North Carolina has already purchased two adjacent properties totaling 81 acres. This 10-acre addition is part of its plan to create Waterrock Knob – Plott Balsams Park along the Parkway.Read Karen Chavez’s full story in the Asheville Citizen-Times here.last_img

Coronavirus: The Russian provinces buckling under Covid-19

first_imgCovid-19 infection rates are now surging again in Russia and this time the poorer provinces are being hit the hardest. In northern regions like Arkhangelsk patients have been forced to sleep on benches and in corridors and ambulance crews are overwhelmed. Health workers in Russia are usually wary of sounding critical, but now they are reaching breaking point and are speaking out about their challenges. BBC Moscow correspondent Sarah Rainsford headed north to meet them.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img