Below-the-Line Women Speak Out on Gender and Experience

first_imgWe sat down with three women from the filmmaking industry to talk about their own experiences and the larger conversation about women in the film industry.We conducted a roundtable with three working professionals: documentary filmmaker Crystal Kayiza, director of photography Kristy Tully, and editor Carla Gutierrez. The result is a candid and informative peek into their world as women of different ages and races working in the film industry.A still from Edgecombe by Crystal Kayiza, an official selection of the Shorts Programs at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by Pete Quandt.PremiumBeat: Crystal, your short documentary, Edgecombe, was a nominee for Short Film Grand Jury Prize at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. It won the Gold Plaque at the Chicago International Film Festival. Clearly, it is beautifully realized and well received — what was the path for you in getting it made? Did you find any resistance because of your gender, race, or youth?Crystal Kayiza: I was very fortunate to have a great support network, while making Edgecombe. I was a Woman Filmmaker Fellow at the Jacob Burns Film Center, and the project was produced through the Creative Culture program there. If anything, I think my own internalized issue with the film industry, in relation to my gender and race, was an obstacle. Even with a supportive environment, it becomes easy to second-guess your creative decisions.I was very lucky to have this project be supported by the Sundance Ignite Fellowship and Adobe. Even applying for that fellowship felt like a huge step, and something that I didn’t deserve. For most of my film education, I wasn’t exposed to a lot of non-fiction female filmmakers — which is wild to think about today. My experience taught me that a lot of the craft was about being a technician, and those roles — cinematographer, gaffer, sound ops, editor, colorist — were for men who were supporting the vision of male directors. I’ve had a very privileged experience, in that, I’ve had mentors and programs to affirm, and support me, along the way.PB: We know so much of history is written about men by men. Kristy, you were cinematographer for Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly Ivins, and Carla, you edited RBG. Both subjects were larger than life women, and the directors were women. How important is it for women to champion documentaries about women driven by women, and what has been your experience with audiences for the film?Editor Carla Gutierrez: I think it’s super important. What inspired RBG was that most people didn’t know about Justice Ginsburg’s role, in fighting for gender equality in the law, in the 70s. I was, like many, a fan of RBG, the judge, but I had no idea how crucial she was to my legal rights, as a woman. Her early work is super important in our history, and few people knew about it. So yes, to bring stories like this to the forefront is essential to complete the untold parts of our history — the stories on the margin. The stories of women.The most exciting has been to see different generations of women go to the theaters — together — to see the film. We heard of women who would take their mothers and daughters, or granddaughters, to watch the film. And, most come out surprised that they didn’t know this part of our history. It’s been really amazing.Kristy Tully: It just makes sense to me that women would be interested in other kick-ass women, and want to shine a light on their contribution. I had such a great time working with Janice, the director on this film. Molly Ivins is a huge inspiration, reminding us to speak truth to power, raise hell, and have fun while you’re doing it. Audiences have responded really well. It’s just so timely. What she was writing about 20 years ago is somehow even more relevant today. She was a journalist before twitter, and social media, and you just gotta wonder what she’d be adding to the discourse in this country, if she were alive today.We just won the audience award at SXSW, and we had a wonderful heartfelt response at Sundance. The film will go on to several more festivals across the country, starting next week, and I’m just really excited for people to get excited by the film, and inspired by this great Texan!Molly Ivins.PB: Do you think there is any validity to the female gaze? If the director, cinematographer, or editor is female, and the subject is also female, the object of the film takes on a different role?Carla: Yes, I strongly feel that there is validity to the female gaze. From picking the subject, to the focus of the story or narrative approach, our perspective as women informs every aspect of our storytelling. It offers, I think, more complete images of female subjects.For example, during post production on RBG, the directors conveyed early on how important it was to show Justice Ginsburg as an older woman, in present day. Not to only focus on her days as a young lawyer, but really show the splendor of her later years, visually, and return to those present moments, often. I think that conscious decision to focus on how much power and intellect a woman carries on her wrinkles, and how sexy that is, really came through in the way we approached the footage.Kristy: I think the female gaze is as real as the male gaze. I believe, however, that it is a choice the film makers make when deciding a film’s point of view, rather than if females or males are behind the camera.At the beginning of a project, you talk about the subject of the film, and then, more specifically, what the film is about. What is the camera visually saying, what is the camera’s prerogative, which can be different than what the film’s subject matter. I’ve been a part of the male gaze, and I’ve seen men contribute to the female gaze.Honestly, I’m not doing justice to the real conversation, here, about female gaze vs. male gaze. Is the female gaze simply the opposite of the male gaze — it is objectification of men on screen. Or, is there a female centric vision that is slowly making its way into our film culture, which would better represent the notion of the female gaze? But, that discussion is probably for another day 🙂Crystal: I think all visual storytellers need to be conscious of gaze. I think people who identify as women, who are directors, cinematographers, editors, designers, production assistants, or wherever you are on set, are sometimes pushed to move through spaces, differently, because of how we see gender on set, or in the field. I believe that the way that women do and don’t experience power, in film, changes our perspective. What’s stunning about this medium, particularly non-fiction storytelling, is the way that women are using that experience to challenge the ways we tell stories.Crystal Kayiza, director of Edgecombe, an official selection of the Shorts Programs at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by Andrea Gutierrez.PB: Gersha Phillips, costume designer for Star Trek: Discovery, had this to say after we suggested her designs were sexy, but not sexist. The women looked amazing, but unexploited. “Sexy means something different to every person you talk to, and I love working with that. My goal was to empower the female and male cast equally.”How often, when you work on a project, do you feel the female characters are as empowered as the men? And, in regard to the actor, are women given the same agency as men, in terms of being heard and respected?Crystal: In documentary film, I think a lot about how women are seen. There’s casting that happens in non-fiction storytelling as well, and it’s important to remain conscious of who is speaking on behalf of communities, and depending on the topic, who we see as experts within documentary projects. People, often times, engage with documentaries as a representation of a community. In our culture, many women aren’t believed when they say the same things as men, or aren’t seen, when they move through frames, the same way as men. As a director, I have to be conscious of that bias, and challenge those assumptions.Kristy: I’ve had the pleasure to work on two documentaries, recently, that are about empowered women getting attention right now. Feminists, What Are They Thinking (Netflix) and Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly Ivins (Sundance, SXSW 2019). I feel like there is a collective consciousness, right now, that’s interested in telling and seeing these stories.I, also, work as a sometimes camera operator on TV series. I worked on I Love Dick, which is basically a moving meditation on the female gaze; Transparent  and Big Little Lies, which is dedicated to empowered women, both in front of, and behind, the camera. I also, recently, operated on Good Girls: Season 2. I filled in for a camera operator while she had a baby. Think about how rare of a sentence that is! The show is about empowered, accidental money laundering…..women. I think it speaks to the times that seem to be surrounded by woman centric projects, and also speaks to the effort that is actively working to cultivate female talent.I was given an opportunity to work on I Love Dick partly because of my documentary experience, and more importantly, because of Jill Solloway’s and Jim Frohna’s intent to cultivate female talent. I feel so fortunate to have been able to be a part of these projects. They are leading the way in this area.Carla: Well, as a documentary editor, we have the chance to write the story in collaboration with the director. There are already rich stories, in the footage, we are given to work with, and I’ve been lucky enough to work on many films about real-life, strong female characters. From the extraordinary singer Chavela Vargas, to the only professional female bullfighter in Spain, to a nun helping families find their disappeared relatives in the corrupt landscape of the US-Mexico drug war. I think there are more complex, diverse stories of empowered women in documentaries than you might find in fiction films. But, there could be a lot more.PB: We recently interviewed cinematographer, Carolina Costa, and asked how gender plays a role in the way she works, is respected, and heard. This is what she had to say:It’s definitely getting better. I can see big changes in the 15 years I have in our industry, but we still have a ways to go. It’s funny to answer this question today because, just two weeks ago, I was mentoring a young woman and was mentioning that my gender was a much bigger issue at the beginning of my career, than it is now. Cut to two days later, on the film I am shooting right now, and some technical crew that came with a crane were mansplaining to me how a crane worked — I was baffled. And this was to make an excuse, why they couldn’t execute with precision, the shot I had requested. A few days after, I was interviewing MOVI operators for the same job, and I can’t get off my mind the face of disgust that this one guy had, once he realized I was going to be his boss. That being said, both my producer and my director, who are males, were also shocked by the situation.Have you had similar experiences?Crystal: I’m fortunate to, mostly, work with people I trust. I’m not afraid to ask questions. Regardless of scale, there are so many moving parts to making a film, and posturing disrupts the creative process. In that sense, I’m lucky. I’ve seen, and been in situations, where one question turns into waiting for men to finish explaining something you know how to do. I’ve watched men ask questions and be seen as thoughtful and intelligent, and when women ask the same thing, they’re seen as unqualified. It’s the culture of how we communicate. It’s simple decisions like only hiring male PA’s because “they’ll get the job done,” but not a woman — the underlying assumption being that she’ll need more help. One piece of advice I got from a male producer was that it’s beneficial, for women who direct, to know the craft as well, or better, than men so that you can retain creative control of your work. But, that’s been my upbringing, in a lot of ways, as a black woman. Hearing that I need to be twice as good.Carla: I have had MANY instances of mansplaining. Other male editors “showing” me how to do a pretty basic shortcut on my edit system, as if they were showing me the world. Or a male assistant editor, talking over my head to the producers, about how to do the color correction for the film (he was totally wrong, by the way). I think that there is still a little ambivalence to hear from a woman about how to handle the technical aspects of an edit. I have worked with many amazing male directors, and I have the utmost respect for them. But, I sometimes have to wonder if my creative opinion is perceived with a little more resistance, because of my gender (or my thick accent). I don’t quite know if that’s correct. The edit room is such a delicate, creative space, that many factors are at play when you face a roadblock, or when magic happens.It is very encouraging to see so many women documentary editors in our community. And I think there is a real camaraderie among us. I consider many of them mentors, who’ve had a significant impact in my career, and my creative development. The one thing I would like to find out is if we are at the same salary level, as the men – based on similar experience, of course. That’s something I’m curious about.Kristy Tully.Kristy: I think a dialogue is important. I am cautious about framing these sorts of discussions, in ways that even might be construed of being answered from the place of “other,” because I don’t think it serves us. The truth is, there is bad behavior, sometimes, on set. I have stopped pathologizing the behavior, and instead, moved to surround myself with people that are collaborative, interested, and talented. In doing this, I think I have become available to some wonderful opportunities, to work with people who are amazing communicators and collaborators. Of course, there will continue to be bad behavior on set, and I invite women to stop questioning if their gender plays a role in it, and start wondering how to move away from negative energy, and encourage the kind of working environment that is enthusiastically creative.Jill Solloway is a wonderful example to mention here, as well. She strives to create a working environment that builds people up, and gives people room to grow. My first day on her set of I Love Dick was really surprising. I was used to the quick-witted, slightly inappropriate, banter I had become so fluent in (and good at).It was challenging to put aside my defense mechanisms, and become invested in being a part of a creative, supportive collective. I admire her for it, and I take that spirit with me to my other projects. I try to create an environment of respect, collaboration, and encouragement. It’s easy to be sarcastic and judgmental, on set. I’ve worked hard to put that easy go-to vocabulary aside, and work to be more communicative and positive in my problem solving, on set. That is a great discussion to have when thinking about this topic.Cover image via Kristy Tully.Looking for more industry interviews? Check these out.Industry Insights: The Blasting Company on Animation ScoringThe Editor of “Us” on Working with Jordan Peele and the Horror GenreIndustry Insights: Composing for Supergirl, Riverdale, and Nancy DrewIndustry Interview: Behind the Lens with Filmmaker Carolina CostaThe Costume Design Behind Star Trek, House of Cards, and Greek Weddinglast_img read more

I walk out for my country, not just the team: Rohit Sharma

first_imgAmid rift rumours between Virat Kohli and Rohit Sharma, the Indian men’s cricket team departed for a full fledged month-long tour of the United States and the Caribbean on Monday.Hours after the team left for the US, India vice-captain Rohit Sharma took to Twitter to post a picture saying, “I don’t just walk out for my Team. I walk out for my country.”Reports of differences between captain Virat Kohli and vice-captain Rohit Sharma have been doing the rounds ever since India’s World Cup 2019 campaign got over.I don’t just walk out for my Team. I walk out for my country. pic.twitter.com/S4RFkC0pSkRohit Sharma (@ImRo45) July 31, 2019However, in a pre-departure press conference ahead of the West Indies tour, Virat Kohli rubbished the rift reports by calling all such news as ‘ridiculous’ and disrespectful’.Addressing the media on Monday, Virat Kohli said: “In my opinion it’s baffling to be honest. It’s absolutely ridiculous to read such stuff that comes out. I have been to a few public events and the sentiment is “aap log kya khele (you guys played so well).”We are feeding off lies. We are overlooking facts. We are turning a blind eye to all the good things that has happened. We are creating fantasies and scenarios in our head and want to accept that this is the truth.”India head coach Ravi Shastri too said the dressing room atmosphere in the India team is healthy and the rift rumours were nothing but ‘nonsense’.advertisement”The way this team plays, no individual is bigger than the game. Not me, not him (Virat), nobody in the team. And the way they play, it is in the interest of the team. You cannot have the kind of consistency across all the formats, if you have rifts or divisions. I have been part of the dressing room and none of that nonsense is there,” said Ravi Shastri.The series between India and West Indies starts from August 3 and includes 3 T20Is, followed by an equal number of ODIs, with the 2 Test series starting from August 22.This will be India’s first tournament since the semi-final exit from the World Cup 2019 after defeat against New Zealand. The 2-match Test series against West Indies will also be part of the inaugural edition of World Test Championship and will have 120 WTC points on offer for both the teams.Read more | Jofra Archer misses out as England announce squad for opening Ashes TestAlso see:last_img read more

SPECIAL DEAL FOR NTL REFEREES

first_imgIf you’re a referee that’s heading to the NTL in 2 weeks time, (or you’re just a referee after a good deal), then this story is for you.TFA are offering a special deal on socks with the old TFA logo.TFA are offering green and gold long socks and green and gold sports socks in all sizes for $5.50 per pair. Normally $7.70 per pair the special deal is only available until Tuesday February 28th.There is also limited stock in red and blue long socks and sports socks, so if you’re interested in placing an order email Rachel at [email protected] or call 1800 654 951NTL referees please note…there will be no gear for sale at the NTL, if you are going to need some spare socks, make the most of this sale and pick up a pair now.last_img

a month agoPerez: Everton more likely to buy Propper than Ajax

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Perez: Everton more likely to buy Propper than Ajaxby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Ajax striker Kenneth Perez could see his old club being interested in Brighton midfielder Davy Propper.However, Perez says Ajax would not have the spending power to convince Brighton to sell.”Do you really think they could just pick up a boy like that?” quizzed Perez on FOX Sports.”He played one year in the Premier League at Brighton (in fact two years). He did very well.”What would Brighton not ask for him?”He had a good year at Brighton. There is a good chance that another English club would also be interested. For example, Everton laughs and pays thirty, forty, fifty million euros for a domestic transfer.” last_img read more

Odfjell to Acquire CTGs Five Stainless Steel Newbuildings

first_imgzoom Norwegian shipping and tank terminal company Odfjell has signed a Term Sheet with Chemical Transportation Group (CTG) to purchase the last five stainless steel newbuildings.The ships are a part of a newbuilding order of ten 25,000 dwt vessels with 24 stainless steel tanks, under construction at Chinese shipbuilder AVIC Dingheng.With these additions, Odfjell and CTG will form a pool with fifteen 25,000 dwt chemical tankers. CTG will continue to own the quintet, which will be placed in the pool commercially managed by Odfjell Tankers AS.The company said that it will pay a price of USD 40 million per vessel upon delivery from yard. The vessels are scheduled to be handed over during a period from June 2017 through May 2018.Ships that will remain under CTG ownership will enter the pool as soon as existing pool agreements and charters expire in the coming 6-12 months.“This transaction will be in line with our strategy ‘the Odfjell Compass’ and will complete most of our current tonnage ambitions. It will, together with other recent tonnage initiatives, ensure that Odfjell can continue to offer competitive and efficient service to our customers,” Kristian Mørch, CEO of Odfjell SE, said.The transaction is subject to final negotiations and execution of definitive documentation and customary closing conditions.last_img read more

Why Its So Hard For NFL Players To Get Rid Of The

Embed Code FiveThirtyEight Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s show (July 12, 2016), we welcome ESPN The Magazine’s Mina Kimes as a guest host.We look at Von Miller’s battle with the Denver Broncos over his franchise tag, and Mina explains why the tag is a problem for players in the NFL. Then, we break down the numbers behind Daniel Murphy’s revenge run against the New York Mets and offer some insights into how the 2016 Major League Baseball season is shaping up at the All-Star break. Finally, this week features the deadest day in the sporting calendar, with all four major sports out of action. We wonder what the WNBA and MLS, which are still in action, could possibly do to capture the public’s attention. Plus, a significant digit on Tim Duncan, the NBA great who retired on Monday.Links to what we discuss are here:Von Miller says he won’t play under the franchise tag.Joel Corry at CBS breaks down what a new long-term contract for Von Miller would look like.Mina Kimes on Darrelle Revis’s savvy contract negotiations.Neil Paine says the Cleveland Indians are dominating Major League Baseball like its the ’90s again.Chelsea Janes in The Washington Post tells the story of Daniel Murphy’s super season.Rob Arthur and Ben Lindbergh try to work out why baseball teams are hitting so many home runs.In 2014, Neil Paine wrote about the deadest sports days of the year.Significant Digits: 17 and 10. That’s the number of points and rebounds Tim Duncan averaged every single year in his career except 2015-16. Duncan retired on Monday at the grand old age of 40. More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. read more

Ohio State field hockey aims to turn around 02 start

Then-redshirt-junior Logan Jones holds his follow-through after a tee shot at the Robert Kepler Intercollegiate on April 12 in Columbus. OSU placed 6th on the first day of play and 5th after the second round.Credit: Lantern file photoThe Ohio State field hockey team could not pull out a victory over its opening weekend, but some players said they are still full of confidence heading into Friday’s scheduled face-off with Miami (Ohio).“I think we’re all determined to come out hard after this (last) weekend,” junior forward Peanut Johnson said. “I have a sour taste in my mouth after this weekend so I’m definitely going to come out hard.”The Buckeyes (0-2) are looking to bounce back after being shutout, 4-0, by the Albany Great Danes on Monday afternoon.Much of the team’s woes may have come from a lack of posession. In all, the Buckeyes were outshot 58-14 in their first two matchups against Syracuse and Albany.“We’re able to complete a couple passes,” coach Anne Wilkinson said. “But then we’re having a rough time stringing longer passes together.”The Buckeyes may have to improve their offensive efficiency to help keep pressure off freshman goalkeeper Liz Tamburro. The Phoenixville, Pa., native made 25 saves in her first two collegiate starts.Tamburro’s 14 saves Monday against Albany were the most in a single game by a Buckeye since 2003.OSU has been focused on sustaining a constant attack in recent practices, Wilkinson said.“When we get it up there we’re very good at executing and finishing,” she said.The Redhawks (0-2) are also set to come into Columbus Friday in search of their first win after falling to Syracuse, 5-1, in the Buckeye Classic to open the season, and then losing to Northwestern at home by the same score.Miami’s senior back Ali Froede scored her 15th career goal in the loss to Northwestern on Tuesday.The Redhawks return 14 letter winners, including Froede and junior midfielder Bea Dechant. Both players earned First Team All Mid-American Conference honors last season.Defending set plays will be the key to slowing down the Redhawks’ attack, Tamburro said.“We need to start with defensive corners,” she said. “Focusing more and trying to get the ball out (of the corner).”OSU has defeated Miami in three of the last five meetings dating back to 2009, but the Redhawks have won the last two. Wilkinson said Miami’s ability to play together as a unit is what makes it so tough.“They’re a very systematic team,” Wilkinson said. “We need to be able to break them down one at a time.”Ultimately the game will come down to which team is able to possess the ball and capitalize off those possessions, Wilkinson said.“They (the Buckeyes) have really been working hard as far as finishing what they start,” she said. “Finish their passes. Finish their tackles.”OSU and the Redhawks are set to face-off at 5 p.m. read more

Rep Bumstead votes in support of House approved road funding plan

first_img22Oct Rep. Bumstead votes in support of House approved road funding plan Categories: News Lawmaker: Plan is a good compromise, step in the right directioncenter_img A long-term plan to fix Michigan’s crumbling roads and bridges has been approved by the House, announced state Rep. Jon Bumstead.“This plan utilizes ideas from both sides of the aisle to see that Michigan has viable, long-term solutions to fix the roads in our community and across the state,” said Rep. Bumstead, R-Newaygo.The new plan uses $600 million in existing General Fund dollars and raises an additional $600 million in new revenue that will be used specifically to fix Michigan’s infrastructure. The funds raised from new revenue will come partially from a 3.3 cent increase in gas tax, a parity to match diesel tax to gasoline and an increase in vehicle registration fees.The compromise plan also provides $200 million in tax relief by expanding the Homestead Property Tax Credit for Michiganders across the state. Additionally, a mechanism is included that triggers a reduction in state income tax as normal, statewide inflation increases over time.“While I would have preferred that all of the money came from existing funds, this approach allows all of our legislative leaders the opportunity to get on board,” Rep. Bumstead said. “In addition to providing long-term solutions that allow Michigan to put this issue behind us, this plan also creates a significant amount of tax relief for hardworking taxpayers across the state.”The legislative package now moves to the Senate for further consideration.###last_img read more