Grateful Dead Pianist Tom Constanten Is Recovering From Neurosurgery After Falling

first_imgEarly Grateful Dead keyboardist Tom Constanten is in stable condition today, following a major fall that required immediate surgery last week. According to Constanten, he was getting out his car when he tripped on some uneven, wet pavement and fell into the concrete. Fortunately, 911 was called immediately, and an excellent team of doctors were able to perform a quick and life-saving surgery.Constanten tells the story in the public Facebook post below:Fell down and broke my neck last Wednesday. Just like they warned me about as a kid. I’d driven up to the Post Office at the top of the hill to mail off a bill, and, knowing there was heavy rain in the forecast, figured it would be better to mail it off inside. I parked the car, and on the way in a bit of uneven pavement tripped me up. I fell, face first, onto the concrete. I am so very grateful for the woman who spotted me right away and called 911; for the ambulance crew, who got there so fast; for their professionalism and teamwork; for the uniformly excellent care at Novant Presbyterian Hospital; for the skill of Dr. Healy, the neurosurgeon who performed the procedure that pulled me out of the darkness and into the light, for Dr. Guignard, for the anæsthesiologist, Dr….well, I’m spacing on his name, maybe because he did such a good job. For the surgeon who stitched up my forehead. For the nurses, Beverly, Brooke, Brittany, Iseta, Julio, Cliff, Ali, Amelia… I get back to the house, and the first thing I’m aware of is a forest of wonderful friends near and far showing such unbelievably warm support. I’ve experienced it before and, even though I have no idea what I might have done to deserve it, I felt the lift and reassurance. There have been rough patches in my life these past fifteen years, and it’s helped me get through it. Many times I thought of checking out, but my heart won’t buy it. The attitude of gratitude is in full bloom in this garden.[H/T Jambands]last_img read more

Regulator sets out model for UK master trust authorisation

first_img“We will also supervise these schemes to ensure that they continue to meet the authorisation criteria, are well-run and offer good value for members.“Our policy outlines how we will be collaborative in supervising schemes, but tough to use our powers, including de-authorising schemes, if they drop below the standards outlined in legislation.”#*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# The UK’s Pensions Regulator (TPR) has published its proposed regulatory framework for defined contribution (DC) master trusts.The proposed rulebook will take effect from October, when the multi-employer DC market becomes subject to TPR’s authorisation regime. Providers will have until April to apply for authorisation.The draft rules, published yesterday, set out TPR’s policy for regular monitoring of master trusts, the circumstances in which it would increase its engagement with particular schemes, and what would happen if a scheme was struck off its list of authorised providers.Kim Brown, head of master trust authorisation and supervision at TPR, said: “Authorisation will create a market with better safeguards. To do that we need to set the standards that every master trust must meet to operate once they have been authorised, or set up in the market. Source: Department for Work and PensionsThe government expects the master trust market to shrink by a third after authorisation kicks inTPR outlined its plans to monitor the individuals running a master trust, the financial strength of the trust’s backers, the robustness and quality of its systems and processes, and its continuity planning.Should the regulator decide a trust posed a high risk to its members, it would impose additional supervision measures such as face-to-face meetings with managers and trustees, and in some cases the appointment of a named supervisor to enhance monitoring of risks and mitigation efforts.“New master trusts can expect to receive a higher level of supervision than those who are more established because they will not have an operational track record,” the regulator said. “Higher intensity supervision will give these master trusts the opportunity to demonstrate that they continue to meet the authorisation criteria.”In deciding whether to withdraw a master trust’s authorisation, TPR said it would consider aspects including the frequency and impact of rule breaches, the sustainability of the trust, the “intention and behaviour of individuals involved in running the master trust”, and the impact on members.“We are more likely to withdraw authorisation where the master trust frequently fails to meet the authorisation criteria and/or the impact of any failures are a significant detriment to members,” TPR stated.The UK government has previously estimated that the number of master trusts could shrink by more than a third when the new authorisation regime kicks in.The consultation on the new rules runs until 23 August. The draft rules are available here, and TPR’s feedback form is here.last_img read more

TRIPLE CROWN CHAMP VICTOR ESPINOZA WINS 2016 SANTA ANITA GEORGE WOOLF MEMORIAL JOCKEY AWARD; MEXICO CITY NATIVE SELECTED BY A VOTE OF JOCKEYS NATIONWIDE

first_imgWOOLF AWARD TROPHY TO BE PRESENTED AT SANTA ANITA ON MARCH 13 ARCADIA, Calif. (Feb. 24, 2016)–As America’s first Triple Crown Champion jockey in 37 years, Victor Espinoza helped Thoroughbred racing project a positive image far beyond the confines of the Thoroughbred industry throughout 2015, thus elevating the sport’s exposure and acceptance to a level perhaps not seen since the 1970s. Accordingly, Espinoza, a 43-year-old native of Mexico City, has been selected by a vote of jockeys nationwide as the winner of Santa Anita’s highly coveted 2016 George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award.“It’s quite an honor for any rider to be selected by his peers as the winner of such a prestigious award,” said Terry Meyocks, National Manager of the Jockeys’ Guild. “And I would like to congratulate Victor on this great achievement.”In addition to numerous national television appearances through the 2015 Triple Crown and last fall’s Breeders’ Cup World Championships, Espinoza also remained tireless in his efforts on behalf of cancer-stricken youth, donating 10 percent of his winnings to support pediatric cancer research at City of Hope, in nearby Duarte.With the Bob Baffert-trained American Pharoah providing the horsepower, Espinoza gleefully proclaimed himself “The luckiest Mexican on earth,” on national television following their win in the Belmont Stakes June 6.In addition to winning the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont, Espinoza and Santa Anita-based American Pharoah won last year’s Grade II Rebel Stakes, Grade I Arkansas Derby, Grade I Haskell Invitational and, in a performance for the ages, the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic by 6 ½ lengths on Oct. 31–all the while elevating the profile of jockeys nationwide and generating tremendous ratings on a consistent basis.Born on a dairy farm near Mexico City, Espinoza is the 11th of 12 children. A three-time ESPY Award winner, Espinoza has three career Kentucky Derby wins, three Preakness victories, three Breeders’ Cup wins and he’s taken 11 Southern California riding titles.First presented by Santa Anita in 1950, Espinoza is the 67th winner of the Woolf Award, which seeks to honor riders whose careers and personal character earn esteem for the individual and Thoroughbred racing. The remaining four finalists for this year’s award, which can only be won once during a rider’s career, were Joe Bravo, Javier Castellano, Gerard Melancon and Joe Steiner.Espinoza will be presented with the 2016 Woolf Award trophy in a Winner’s Circle ceremony on Sunday, March 13.last_img read more