Russia: JSC Admiralteyskie Verfi Shipyard Holds Keel-Laying Ceremony for Submarine B-237

first_img View post tag: holds View post tag: Admiralteyskie View post tag: Navy View post tag: submarine View post tag: JSC View post tag: Naval View post tag: Keel-Laying View post tag: Ceremony Share this article Solemn keel-laying ceremony of non-nuclear submarine B-237 Rostov-na-Donu took place on Nov 21, 2011 at JSC Admiralteyskie Verfi shipyard.The ceremony was attended by members of Russian government, St. Petersburg city administration, directors of Admiralteyskie Verfi, representatives of developer (Rubin Design Bureau) and orderer (Russian Navy).This is the second Project 06363 non-nuclear submarine laid down at Admiralteyskie Verfi for Russian Navy. Construction of similar submarine Novorossiysk was started there in Aug 2010. In total, it is planned to build three Project 06363 subs for Russian Navy.All subs will serve at Black Sea Fleet. The first submarine is expected to join the fleet in 2013. Second and third subs are to be completed in 2014. As was earlier reported, the series could be 3 submarines larger with delivery of the last one in 2015.Project 636 Rostov-na-Donu is the third-generation diesel electric submarine; she is upgraded version of Project 877/877EKM known for excellent performance characteristics. The project is developed by Rubin Design Bureau. Project 636 submarines are distinguished by high silence, advanced navigation and comm equipment, mighty missile/torpedo armament. Test depth is 300 meters; endurance is 45 days; crew is 52 men.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , November 22, 2011; Image: 4flying View post tag: shipyard View post tag: Verfi View post tag: B-237 Russia: JSC Admiralteyskie Verfi Shipyard Holds Keel-Laying Ceremony for Submarine B-237 View post tag: Russia November 22, 2011 View post tag: News by topic Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia: JSC Admiralteyskie Verfi Shipyard Holds Keel-Laying Ceremony for Submarine B-237 Industry newslast_img read more

SPECIAL DEAL FOR NTL REFEREES

first_imgIf you’re a referee that’s heading to the NTL in 2 weeks time, (or you’re just a referee after a good deal), then this story is for you.TFA are offering a special deal on socks with the old TFA logo.TFA are offering green and gold long socks and green and gold sports socks in all sizes for $5.50 per pair. Normally $7.70 per pair the special deal is only available until Tuesday February 28th.There is also limited stock in red and blue long socks and sports socks, so if you’re interested in placing an order email Rachel at [email protected] or call 1800 654 951NTL referees please note…there will be no gear for sale at the NTL, if you are going to need some spare socks, make the most of this sale and pick up a pair now.last_img

20 days agoLiverpool boss Klopp delivers huge Alisson boost

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Liverpool boss Klopp delivers huge Alisson boostby Paul Vegas20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp says Alisson Becker is ready to return.The Brazilian keeper has been sidelined for seven weeks with a calf tear he suffered as the curtain came up on the new season.But he has trained fully for the last 10 days, and has now returned to squad training, and crucially, Klopp confirmed he has done all the defensive drills with the first team.That is the biggest hint yet that he will make his comeback against Leicester on Saturday, with the manager clearing the way when agreed he could play the keeper with no risks: “It’s different for keepers, yes. Alisson has been training for 10 days, now he is in team training.“If yesterday was his first training session, we would not have to even think about it, but I have to talk. Yesterday he trained with the team for the first time and looked really good.“Ali has been doing all the training already for 10 days and is now team training. He has done important stuff. We could take him out of the general team stuff and do work of much higher intensity than he could do in just a five a side, so he is there.” last_img read more

Media magnate Peladeau evasive about potential return to politics

first_imgMONTREAL – Quebec telecom and media magnate Pierre Karl Peladeau renewed speculation Tuesday he is considering a return to politics.His abrupt departure in May 2016 as head of the Parti Quebecois was against his will and due to family reasons, he told Radio-Canada.But things have changed since then, he suggested.“Obviously I remain ready for the (political) moment,” Peladeau said, unprompted, to the radio host during a wide-ranging interview. “Maybe, eventually you would have asked me about that.”Anyone following the social media posts of the self-avowed nationalist who wanted to be leader of an independent Quebec will not be surprised he is not closing the door to an eventual political comeback.As head of Quebecor Inc., Peladeau owns some of the most popular media and telecom properties in the country and the businessman isn’t shy about using his influence and profile to publicly criticize his opponents.He has come out strongly against the Quebec Liberal’s investment in aerospace giant Bombardier, as well as the government’s recent multimillion-dollar aid package to newspaper companies in competition with his own.Peladeau has also attacked Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for the federal government’s refusal to levy a tax on online streaming giant Netflix.“When I think we are going in the wrong direction, when we as a collective are going in the wrong direction … it’s the reason why I speak out and there is no one who will stop me,” he said Tuesday.Peladeau’s remarks were in response to a recent column in Montreal La Presse, a major news outlet owned by Power Corp. of Canada and controlled by a powerful Quebec family he’s openly feuded with for years.In the column, Yves Boisvert suggested Peladeau is the de facto leader of Quebec’s opposition, due to the media mogul’s constant and aggressive public sorties on social media.“For the time being, he is the CEO of a very large communications company and should show a little better that he understands the difference between his old job as a politician, even if he is bored, and his new job, even if it is only temporary,” Boisvert wrote.Peladeau countered: “Who is he to tell me what I can say?”Despite the businessman’s public statements, the speculation around his potential return to politics is being fed by the slow decline in popularity of the PQ.The party has been polling in third place for months as it loses support among critical francophone voters and in the outlying regions where it has been historically strong.“We have a leader right now and it’s Jean-Francois Lisee,” Peladeau said, conspicuously using the term “we,” while reminding the radio host he is still a member of the party. “I have always been attentive to collegiality … I would like to leave my colleagues continue their political work.”Lisee was asked later in the day about Peladeau’s comments and said, “the door is wide open.”Peladeau, he added, would be welcome to run for the PQ in the Oct. 1 election.When asked if a potential return would threaten his leadership, Lisee responded, “we need to have a strong team. I am a leader who wants to be surrounded by strong team members who have ambition.”Bernard Drainville, a former PQ cabinet minister close to Peladeau and who recently joined his television network, said, “according to his entourage, Peladeau misses politics.”Drainville made the comments on a popular news commentary show on Peladeau’s flagship news network, LCN.“But will Peladeau lead a putsch to remove Lisee? The answer is no.”And as for his family situation, Peladeau suggested it is improving.When he quit the PQ in May 2016 after about a year at the helm, he cited family reasons amid his separation from his partner at the time.Peladeau said he was watching TV recently with his nine-year-old daughter, when she told him she wanted him to run for office again.“We now have shared custody, as decided by a court,” Peladeau said. “I’m not sure if I will follow (my daughter’s) advice, but just to put things into context, things evolve.”Companies in this story: (TSX:QBR.B, TSX:POW)last_img read more

Months of deadly unrest devastate Nicaraguas economy

first_imgLEON, Nicaragua – Two days after protests began in Nicaragua in April, a foreign auto components company was meeting at a hotel in the city of Leon when smoke from a burning university building just a block away billowed above the hotel’s colonnaded courtyard.The visitors quickly cut short their event and began changing their travel plans to exit Nicaragua. Within three months, the El Convento hotel itself was forced to close for lack of business, as a sister hotel in the same city had in June.Nicaragua’s economy has been devastated by the nearly five months of unrest sparked by cuts to social security benefits that quickly evolved into calls for President Daniel Ortega to step down.In June, the country’s economic activity was down 12.1 per cent compared to a year earlier, according to the central bank. Economists estimate 200,000 jobs have been shed, including as many as 70,000 in the tourism sector, which has become Nicaragua’s top source of foreign currency in the past two years.Revenue at hotels and restaurants plunged 45 per cent in June compared to 2017, according to Nicaragua’s central bank. Similarly, construction suffered a 35 per cent drop and retail 27 per cent. Some $900 million in deposits fled Nicaragua’s banks. They responded by tightening their lending to preserve liquidity, thus also contributed to the economic slowdown.Nicaraguan Union of Agricultural Producers says more than 12,000 acres of private land have been occupied by government supporters in what business leaders have called confiscations in revenge for their support of the protesters.The producers say 91 per cent of the land occupied by squatters was used for farming and livestock.Victor Hugo Sevilla, the general manager of both Leon hotels, continues checking email, but said “I haven’t gotten any requests from foreigners for reservations. We have received five, maybe eight, rate inquiries from domestic (travellers), but no firm reservations.”Leon, Nicaragua’s second-largest city, was among the places where protests and roadblocks were most intense. From the beginning, those protests were met with violence from riot police and civilian government supporters. In July, they violently cleared the roadblocks and ran protesting students off occupied university campuses.More than 300 people have been killed in the unrest, according to human rights groups. The government calls the protesters “terrorists” and says it defeated an attempt to drive Ortega from office that was sponsored by the U.S. government and domestic opposition, including some in the private sector.Ortega conceded this month that the roadblocks and unrest have cost the country jobs. In an interview with Spanish news agency EFE, he said domestic tourism was starting to return, but “where there has been more of a problem is in attracting international tourism, because this situation tends to repel the tourists.”A major factor has been that the countries that send Nicaragua’s big-spending foreign tourists, including the U.S., Canada, Spain and England, issued travel warnings urging their citizens to avoid travel to Nicaragua.Major airlines such as American and United cut their flights to Managua from three per day to one. Spirit, Delta and other carriers trimmed their flights as well, said Jose Adan Aguerri, president of the Superior Council for Private Enterprise.The council, which is Nicaragua’s main business chamber, joined the call for a national strike Sept. 7. The Civic Alliance, formed to represent a broad swath of Nicaraguan society in a stalled dialogue with the government, said the strike aimed to push the government back to dialogue and to protest the arrest of alliance members and other political prisoners.The country’s primary tourist destinations like the colonial gem Granada and the Pacific coast surfer paradise San Juan del Sur began feeling the consequences of the unrest almost immediately. Hotels and restaurants cut back hours, then days and eventually closed completely.For years, Ortega enjoyed a relatively stable relationship with private business. Since returning to power in 2007, the one-time Marxist rebel commander had softened his views and largely left Nicaragua’s private sector to do what it wanted.The relationship was criticized by some as a tacit agreement to keep the country’s business elites out of politics. In an interview in July with Venezuela’s Telesur network, Ortega said his understanding with Nicaragua’s private sector had been strictly economic and not political.In April, however, the country’s business interests, caught off guard by the social security system changes, quickly joined the opposition. As the social and political crisis deepened, the private sector became increasingly outspoken in calling for Ortega to move up elections.Mario Arana, director of the Nicaragua Association of Producers and Exporters and a former head of the central bank, said the private sector decided to get more involved when student protesters were killed.“When there was an overreaction here to a civil, peaceful protest by the students, where people began to lose their lives, society suffered a social explosion where the private sector aligned with the people,” he said. “The private sector is committed to trying to find a negotiated exit from the crisis.”Juan Sebastian Chamorro, who leads the Nicaraguan Foundation for Economic and Social Development, said the government has shown signs that it recognizes the severity of the economic impact. It has issued new debt, adjusted rules to tighten the selling of dollars and cut public spending as it forecasts a 10 per cent drop in tax revenue.Whether any of that will be enough to stop the economy’s slide is doubtful unless it’s accompanied by a political solution that restores stability, experts said.On Wednesday in Washington, the Organization of American States called on Nicaragua’s government to co-operate with teams investigating human rights abuses and a working group created by the body to support a national dialogue.Nicaragua’s ambassador to the body, Luis Alvarado, responded that the government does not recognize the existence of the working group and therefore had nothing to answer to.For years Leon had been at best a day trip for foreign tourists beginning to explore better-known Granada or San Juan del Sur. But the city had worked hard to get attention and Art Collection Hotels had bet on its prospects by opening its second hotel, La Recoleccion, in 2017.“We had high expectations for this year,” said Sevilla, the manager of the closed hotels.He had 113 employees between the two properties. They were able to suspend 67, which will enable them to come back without losing any benefits of seniority, but the rest were laid off. He has remained in touch with some of the workers. Those still around are taking whatever work they can find, but he estimated at least half left the country, with most of those seeking tourism sector jobs in Costa Rica.The hotels have 190 reservations for November — the start of the high season — but that’s less than half what they had in November last year. Still, he hopes they can start working their way back again in October. Even if that works out, he predicts a slow climb back to normalcy.Cafes and shops selling handicrafts around Leon’s historic centre were open this week, but a number of hotels and hostels in the area were shuttered.“I think it will take at least 12 months, maybe more, to be able to restart the tourism engine,” he said.___Sherman reported from Mexico City. AP writers Maria Verza contributed to this report from Managua and Luis Alonso Lugo contributed from Washington.last_img read more

Breaking another glass ceiling

first_imgWhen Laibi Oinam got in the front seat of a second-hand auto-rickshaw as a driver almost a decade ago, she received a lot of negative attention from people in her home state of Manipur in northeast India. But her life took a new turn in 2015 when her struggle to get passengers and earn her daily bread to support her ailing husband and young sons caught a filmmakers attention. Now in her 50s, Laibi has bought herself a new auto-rickshaw, her younger son is inching closer to his football dream and she enjoys respect in the same society that once looked down upon her for driving an auto and breaking another glass ceiling for women without really knowing it. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainLaibi says that she didn’t take up the job of an autodriver in 2011 to challenge stereotypes. Her husband’s deteriorating health and sons’ education demanded more money. What she earned by working in a brick kiln was insufficient. So, she collected money through chit fund and bought a second-hand auto. “I rented it out to others but we didn’t get much money out of it. Meanwhile my husband got unwell, so I decided to start driving,” Laibi said. Whether it is fighting for a cause or selling vegetables or handloom weaving, traditional male bastions, women in Manipur have always been in the forefront of society. But the same can’t be said about autodrivers. Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma Award”When I started driving auto in 2011, I used to wear phanek (traditional wear of Manipuri women). Later on, I changed to pants as people often refused to take rides because of my gender and outfit,” said Laibi, who learnt how to drive on a Vespa. Since the sight of women autodrivers was not a common one in Manipur, it caught the attention of film director Meena Longjam. “I met her in 2012. It was an accidental encounter. There were many male autodrivers in the market and then there was this one woman waiting to get passengers in her auto. I had never thought that a woman could drive an auto in Manipur,” said the Madras Christian College alumnus. An article on Laibi piqued Meena’s interest. “Someone had written an article on her. Then I thought of talking to her. Also, I remember back in 2011, there was an economic blockade in Manipur for so many months that it crippled all of us. I thought of sending out a message to people through my film. “I wanted to show how despite all the problems in the state, a woman is working hard to support her family,” said the filmmaker. The documentary Autodriver is barely of 30 minutes but Meena gave about three years of her life to it. “While talking to her, I noticed that Laibi has big dreams for her children. Though one of her sons had to drop out of a Sainik school due to her financial condition, she still dreams big. She wants her elder son to become an IAS officer and younger son a footballer. “Her journey is very emotional. She does all the household chores and then heads out to earn money as an autodriver – a challenging job for a woman in Manipur,” she added. The emotional story connected with many. It even bagged the best social issue film in the non-feature category at the 63rd edition of National Film awards. “Now I am a known face. A lot of people have started supporting me. Even traffic police officials don’t bother me much. My younger son is studying in a football academy in Chandigarh. The elder one is almost done with his graduation. I earn around Rs 1,000 per day,” said Laibi. She also revealed that the amount is almost twice what she earned when she started out on her challenging journey.. So once her sons start earning, will she quit driving? About that, Laibi said, “I know how to make ‘phee’ (traditional Manipuri handloom long scarf) but I don’t enjoy doing it. I think I will drive my auto all my life. I like driving. It suits me.”last_img read more

Govt not talking yet on Desarrollos debacle

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 14 Apr 2015 – Still silence from the PNP Administration on the debacle which involves the Desarrollos Hotelco in a court case where it is alleged they accepted $15 million dollars from a confessed Ponzi schemer. The Governor’s Office has only said that the TCIG Press Office would respond. Up to this news production, there is no word on whether the hopes that were coming with a $224 million dollar Ritz Carlton hotel contract, signed on April 2nd, are dashed. The question continues to be ‘who dropped the ball’ and the concern as Magnetic Media got feedback from business and tourism professionals, is how this faux pas will impact the image and reputation of the TCI. The TCI media core did not attend that signing of the multi-million dollar hotel agreement which happened just before Easter; but seen in the photograph are executives of the Investment Unit, Horton Realty, the Finance Minister, the Premier and the Acting Governor with Desarrollos Hotel Group President & CEO, Walter Stipa – one of the individuals named in the case. Documents obtained from the Connecticut court show that the SEC started investigating the matter since 2011 and charges were filed in June 2014. Recommended for you Related Items:desarollos hotelco, ponzi scheme, tci government, walter stipa TCI Government to Donate $100,000 for Dominica Relief Government says Desarrollos will fight law suit; Due diligence ongoing David Smith back in court; continues to fight US Extraditionlast_img read more

Mamata government reduces fuel tax by Re 1 per litre

first_imgKolkata: Urging the Centre to reduce the cess on fuel prices, West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on Tuesday announced that her government has decided to reduce the tax on petrol and diesel by Re 1 per litre. “We demand the Central government to reduce the cess on petrol and diesel. The price of crude oil has gone down, but they are increasing the prices and cess. Both cannot happen simultaneously. The state government does not get any percentage from the cess. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life “In this situation, our government has decided to reduce the prices of petrol and diesel by one rupee per litre,” she said at the state Secretariat Nabanna. She also said mismanagement is going on. The cess imposed by Central government has been increased and no attempts are being made to bring stability in the fuel prices, Banerjee alleged. “In January, 2016 the petrol price was Rs 65.12 a litre and in September 2018 the price has risen to Rs 81.5 per litre. So the petrol price has gone up by Rs 16.48 per litre. Diesel price was Rs 48.80 a litre in 2016 ,now it has risen to Rs 73.26 per litre, which is a hike of Rs 24.46,” Banerjee said.last_img read more