SGA budget passed to fund RA and CRA appreciation day

first_imgFacebook ReddIt printTCU Student Government Association passed a bill to fund the first annual resident assistant and chapter resident assistant appreciation day.SGA set aside $1,830 to fund the day, which will occur Nov. 10, during the Oct. 27 meeting. The student outreach committee and SGA Vice President Liliana Ogden presented the idea with the goal to demonstrate the student body’s gratitude for RAs and CRAs.Ogden wrote in a text RAs are a huge part of keeping the campus happy and healthy. She hopes that students are able to take some time out of their day to let their RA’s know they are valued. Ogden wrote that due to the amount of time the RAs and CRAs spend caring for their residents, they “seldom have time to focus on their needs.”“It’s important to celebrate and recognize everyone and we just thought that it was the RAs time to shine,” Ogden wrote.Kara Potts, a senior RA in Hays Hall, wrote in an text to TCU 360 there is a lot that happens behind the scenes, and students don’t know how much RAs do for the on-campus residents.“Of course people see the programs, but so much of our job happens without anyone noticing,” Potts wrote. Gracelyn Pugh, a junior RA in Waits Hall, expressed her support for the appreciation day.Pugh wrote in a text that that the biggest change she has noticed in residence halls due to COVID-19 is less social interaction between residents because most of them stay in their room for class, but she thinks residents are still finding ways to connect with others.SGA is developing plans to celebrate the day. ReddIt Linkedin Linkedin TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history + posts Lucie Lundquisthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/lucie-lundquist/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Previous articleHall director talks about the responsibilities of working at a residence hall during COVID-19Next articleHoroscope: October 31, 2020 Lucie Lundquist RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img SGA convenes in the BLUU Ballroom this year to follow COVID-19 guidelines. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer) SGA passes resolution to support zero-tolerance policy against hate speech Lucie Lundquist SGA resolution passed to support in-person class Twitter Facebook Twitter Lucie Lundquisthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/lucie-lundquist/ World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution last_img read more

Sustainable Agriculture

first_img“Having the Georgia Organics conference here allows us to highlight all the research and Extension work we have in this area,” she said. During the two-day conference, UGA faculty hosted farm tours at UGArden, the organic farm at Durham Horticulture Farm and at the J. Phil Campbell Sr. Research and Education Center—UGA’s hub for sustainable agriculture research and public outreach. They also hosted hands-on workshops. Pioneers in sustainable agriculture, backyard gardeners and urban homesteaders gathered in Athens this month to share knowledge gathered over years of working the land and to learn new skills from researchers at the University of Georgia. From soil health research to breeding programs for organically produced crops, faculty and staff at UGA have worked to improve the sustainability and efficiency of organic farms in Georgia. “Many people don’t realize how much work we have going on in sustainable agriculture,” said Julia Gaskin, sustainable agriculture coordinator for the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) and winner of Georgia Organics’ 2015 Land Steward Award. Lawton Stewart, assistant professor of animal and dairy science, and Dennis Hancock, associate professor of crop and soil sciences, taught an introductory workshop on sustainable grazing. David Berle, associate professor of horticulture, and JoHannah Biang, UGArden farm manager, taught a class of beginning farmers and gardeners how to build raised beds and how to repair and use small farm machinery. Peter Hartel, retired professor of crop and soil sciences, and Elizabeth Little, assistant professor in plant pathology, helped farmers inspect soil from their farms using microscopes and interpret findings in terms of soil health. Suzanne Stone, a graduate student in horticulture, and Little, assistant professor of plant pathology, helped lead a discussion on the need for better crop varieties for organic producers. Gaskin and George Boyhan, professor of horticulture, gave a workshop on selecting cover crops and how to maximize their benefit.Judy Harrison, professor of foods and nutrition in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, gave updated conference attendees on the Food Safety and Modernization Act and how it affects produce coming from small farms.Bob Waldorf, an Extension coordinator in Banks County, gave an update on UGA’s Master Goat Farmer program. In addition to the tours and workshops, 12 UGA graduate students presented posters on their research at the conference. “You can’t have a conversation about agriculture in Georgia without involving the University of Georgia,” said Alice Rolls, executive director of Georgia Organics. “Agriculture and UGA are synonymous here, and growers of all sizes and types depend on UGA’s research and leadership.” “Without UGA, Georgia Organics’ work and farming in general would be so much more difficult, and that’s why we are grateful to count the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences as an ally in our work to put more Georgia food on Georgia tables,” Rolls added. This most recent Georgia Organics conference is just the latest collaboration between Georgia Organics and the faculty of CAES and UGA Extension. In addition to working on numerous educational programs over the years, Georgia Organics recently collaborated with UGA and several other agricultural advocacy groups to establish a Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Development Program in Georgia. With a $652,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), UGA Extension, Georgia Organics, UGA Small Business Development Center, Fort Valley State University and AgSouth Farm Credit will develop an in-person and distance-training program for beginning farmers. The program will focus on helping these farmers build sustainable businesses as well as sustainable farms. To learn more about sustainable farming research and outreach at UGA, visit www.SustainAgGA.org.last_img read more

FIFA Ranking: Eagles fail to move up log, remain 3rd in Africa

first_imgNigeria’s Super Eagles did not make any move in the monthly Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) rankings released by the world football governing body on Thursday, February 20.Advertisement Senegal’s Teranga Lions retained their spot as the best playing nation in the continent and 20th in the world, but are closely trailed by Tunisia’s Cathage Eagles, who are placed 27th.Algeria’s Desert Foxes occupy the 35th position in the world.Interestinly, Morocco’s Atlas Lions, despite not dropping a spot are 43rd on the og to complete Africa’s top five playing nations.Meanwhile, Belgium stay top as Palestine make gains after very few matches have been played on the international front in the first World Ranking of 2020.At the last count, only 15 friendlies have taken place since the last ranking update in December – including two games in late 2019 – so it is little surprise that the top 20 remains unchanged with Belgium, France and Brazil still making up the top three.Some minor movement in the top 50 sees both Wales (23rd, down 1) and Paraguay (41st, down 1) fall a spot, while Ghana’s Black Stars (46th, up 1) rise ever so slightly. The three-time African champions remain rooted on the 31st spot in the world and third in Africa. Loading… center_img Promoted ContentThe Models Of Paintings Whom The Artists Were Madly In Love With20 Completely Unexpected Facts About ‘The Big Bang Theory’Couples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way6 Major TV Characters We Were Relieved To See Leaving The Show5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks10 Characters Who Would Make Astounding Disney PrincessesWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Fantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread Art7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A Vegetarian7 Of The Wealthiest Universities In The World9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooSan-Francisco Runner Creates Art Just By Jogging Around Read Also: Europa League: Ighalo makes Man United squad vs Club Brugge clashPalestine (103rd, up 3) are the first big climbers of 2020.Their success in January’s Bangabandhu Cup sees them leapfrog Estonia, Trinidad and Tobago, Mozambique and Kenya on the back of the month’s biggest move by points and rank.Beaten Bangabandhu Cup finalists Burundi (149th, up 2), who like Palestine contested four matches in January, have climbed into the top 150.Elsewhere, both Aruba (200th, up 1) and Pakistan (200th, up 1) have edged up the ranking after a rather quiet month in international football.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more