Glasgow’s kiss of life

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What Is That Helicopter In Batesville Doing?

first_imgThe helicopter has been spotted in multiple locations Thursday.BATESVILLE – A helicopter is grabbing the attention of several  Batesville residents and drivers Thursday.The chopper has been spotted hovering over various locations around town including property on around Pocket Road, State Road 229 and Quail Meadows.The helicopter is trimming trees.The sight is certainly drawing interest from several people we, along with local police, have been receiving phone calls from citizens.No word on how long the work will go on.last_img

Hoornstra: For foreign-born baseball players, coronavirus presents unique challenges

first_img Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros “It is extremely busy,” said Clifford Chin, Senior Counsel at Berry Appleman & Leiden. “Number one, it’s what information do we have? Number two, it’s assessing the various interpretations and risks. Number three, it’s the human element. Immigration isn’t just a business. It’s affecting peoples’ lives on a personal level.” In a hypothetical book about Sports and the Coronavirus, you can imagine each of those points deserving a chapter.Last Friday, for example, the acting director of the Department of Homeland Security issued an order exempting certain foreign professional athletes from entry restrictions. If you are not a citizen of the U.S., and you were physically present in China, Iran, the United Kingdom, Ireland, or most of the European mainland, you were barred from entering the U.S. for 14 days. The new order rescinds that ban for athletes, stating “that it is in the national interest to except aliens who compete in professional sporting events … including their professional staff, team and league leadership, spouses, and dependents.”Unless they are on vacation, those countries aren’t where you’ll typically find a baseball player spending his off-season. Last year, 105 players born in the Dominican Republic made an Opening Day roster. Venezuela (68), Cuba (19), Puerto Rico (18) and Mexico (8) followed. Japan and Canada (six each) produced the most players outside of Latin America.Those countries weren’t affected by the most recent ban. But it isn’t hard to imagine a sudden COVID-19 outbreak – such as the one that engulfed Brazil in May – making travel to the U.S. from certain regions less practical, even for a professional athlete.That’s more true for minor league players, who have been paid $400 a week since the season was officially suspended in March. Foreign players who receive seven-figure signing bonuses as teenagers steal the headlines, but they are in the minority. Most Latin American minor leaguers quickly flew home once the season was suspended, rather than remain in the U.S. and try to scrape by on their meager stipend. Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone center_img Still, the agent for a Nicaraguan pitcher told me that players there are feeling less risk-averse than their American counterparts. Baseball might be their year-round job, if they compete in a winter league. Money is scarce, and they might not be trained in another field of employment. A similar problem faces foreign-born minor leaguers in major league organizations once they’re released from their contract – or those in the Oakland A’s system, who won’t be receiving their weekly stipend beginning June 1.“There will be a lot of kids not making a dime,” the agent told me. “What else do they know?”Minor league baseball players aren’t represented by a union. Neither are most players who compete only in the Latin American leagues. Still, their examples serve as a reminder of the unique interests facing the hundreds of major league players who call a foreign country home in the off-season. The novel coronavirus had the potential to unite the world around a common enemy. In the United States, that potential quickly disintegrated. Race, age, geography, and occupational-based hazards divided us into various tiers of risk. Some of us protested. Some of us lost our jobs, or sizable portions of our paychecks. Others – reportedly 100,000 and counting – have died as a result of COVID-19.Sports usually serves as a distraction from these kinds of headlines. Now, it is serving as a microcosm of how a not-so-common enemy strikes us all differently.Each Opening Day, Major League Baseball issues a press release detailing where its players come from. Last year, a total of 251 players represented 20 different countries and territories outside of the United States. Minor league rosters are no less diverse. So what happens to players when the United States closes its borders entirely to certain countries? Or when a foreign country closes its borders altogether, as is the case in the Dominican Republic?If you’re an immigration attorney who represents MLB teams and athletes, what happens is you get inundated with questions. Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Now, with the potential for a season to re-start in June with expanded rosters, attitudes are changing. But flights into the U.S. from Latin America are more scarce. One agent I spoke with this week represents a minor league client who will attempt to leave Panama on a humanitarian flight in June.Several agents I spoke with noted that Venezuelan players fall in a category of their own. In March, president Nicolas Maduro was indicted in United States federal court on three separate conspiracy charges – the latest wrinkle in the country’s political turmoil. With players reluctant to return home under these circumstances, many have been living and training at their team complexes in the Dominican Republic. At least one Venezuelan minor leaguer has been living with his minor league manager in the U.S.Consider the players’ families too. This became a sticking point early in negotiations between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association, when the league proposed quarantining players in a centralized location for an entire season. MLB’s most recent proposal to the union wouldn’t keep players apart from their families during the hypothetical 2020 season. But what if your family lives overseas during the off-season and was planning to relocate for six months? What if the season isn’t six months long anymore?As one agent told me, “A couple of my guys have said, ‘if we’re going to play three months, I’m not going to bring my wife and kids. They can be home and stay safe. Why have them stuck at a house or a hotel?’ Every guy’s going to be different on that.”Back to those various tiers of risk. A cardiologist in the Dominican Republic reportedly sampled 314 residents of Villa Juana, a neighborhood in the capital city of Santo Domingo. Forty percent of the tests came back positive for Covid-19, a number that was disputed by the country’s minister of health.Even if the actual rate of infection is lower on a city-, district-, or nation-wide level, the report contributed to doubts over the accuracy of state-reported testing in Latin American countries. Earlier this month, an outbreak of COVID-19 in Nicaragua forced the postponement of that country’s baseball season. Several players tested positive. One coach, Carlos Aranda, died from the disease.Related Articleslast_img read more

Stanley Cup Final 2019: Blues’ Ryan O’Reilly wins Conn Smythe Trophy

first_img Related News O’Reilly beat out rookie Jordan Binnington, who set a rookie record with 16 wins in the Stanley Cup playoffs. The 25-year-old stopped 32 of 33 shots to lead the Blues to a victory in Game 7.But O’Reilly’s overall play was just too good to pass up as he was fantastic in scoring and on the defensive end, leading a forecheck which dominated a very tough Bruins team.His defense on Patrice Bergeron helped hold down one of the best facilitators in the NHL and win the Stanley Cup. Ryan O’Reilly has won the Conn Smythe Trophy.The Blues won the Stanley Cup Final with a 4-1 victory in Game 7 over the Bruins on Wednesday and it had everything to do with O’Reilly. Stanley Cup Final 2019: Three takeaways from Blues’ Game 7 win Nine points in the Final.A franchise-record 23 points in the #StanleyCup Playoffs.First-year @StLouisBlues forward Ryan O’Reilly is the 2019 Conn Smythe Trophy winner. #NHLStats #Game7 pic.twitter.com/Hm7ULVA4QJ— NHL Public Relations (@PR_NHL) June 13, 2019He scored the first goal of the game, just as he did in the last four games of the Stanley Cup Final.Ryan O’Reilly is the first player to score in four straight Stanley Cup Final games since Wayne Gretzky in 1985.— Chris Johnston (@reporterchris) June 13, 2019He finished with a franchise-record 23 points in the playoffs — eight goals, 15 assists — and, most importantly, helped the Blues win their first-ever championship.last_img read more

PNG girl in the running Golden Boot

first_imgThe Rising star, who is based in Lae, has been performing very well with the highest number of goals scored in every game.The Morobean has scored a total of eight goals so far in the tournament, four goals against Vanuatu, two against Cook Islands and another two against Fiji today.Giada has represented PNG in a number of tournaments including the 2015 Pacific Games and 2014 Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China.She has lived up to expectations with her attacking ability and is a strong contender for the Golden Boot Award.Her two goals today have secured a semi-final spot in the tournament together with Fiji, New Zealand and New Caledonia.last_img

EMMET RUSHE’S FITNESS COLUMN: SLEEP

first_imgBY EMMET RUSHE: Due to the time change last week, we have all lost an hour of sleep, how it affects us differs from person to person, but have no doubt, sleep is very important.
Sleep was actually the first topic in my talk at Enterprise Week; it is one of the most important factors when it comes to health, recovery after training and being focused in business.We have all been there…you are sitting on the sofa and your eyes are burning in your head. Every time you blink, you feel as though you are going to fall into a coma.
 
You get up, struggle into the bedroom and slide under the bed sheets. As you lay your head on the pillow you look forward to a great night’s sleep…….but it doesn’t come. 

Instead you restlessly toss and turn all night, spending endless hours staring at the ceiling, checking the clock, looking at the time on your phone and wondering why you bothered getting into the bed in the first place. 

Finally you fall asleep, only to have the alarm rudely awaken you 2 hours after you finally managed to drift off in the first place. Welcome to bedtime……..The recommended amount of sleep per night should be between 7-8 hours.The average for adults today is around 6 hours.No big deal, right? Wrong!Sleep is the ultimate recovery tool. It is how our bodies and minds repair and recover from daily stresses and it is also how our bodies recover from our exercise and training sessions. 

It is as important as a proper nutrition plan when it comes to your weight loss or muscle building goals.Everything that you do will be affected by a lack of sleep.Your food choices will be poorer. 
When you are tired, you will always be looking for ways to give yourself a kick start. 
High sugary foods, energy drinks and high levels of caffeinated drinks are usually the first thing that people will reach for to get them through the day. 
You will probably not have the time or energy prepare proper meals and may be tempted to go for the pre-packaged processed food choice, or the take away.Your Body will work against you.
In a sleep deprived state, our bodies wreak havoc with our hormones. Our stress hormone cortisol will be high and our hormones Leptin and Ghrelin can also be affected. 
If cortisol is high during sleep you can be in a heightened state of alertness, not what you want for going to sleep.
Ghrelin is a hunger stimulating hormone that tells us when to eat. 
Leptin is an appetite suppressant hormone that tells us when to stop eating. 
When we are in a sleep deprived state we have higher levels of Ghrelin and lower levels of Leptin, which means we will have a false hunger and this can contribute to the poor food choices mentioned above and we won’t know when to stop eating them.

This can all lead to excess weight gain. What can we do to help?Here are 10 strategies that can help you to wind down and relax and may help you to get a better night’s sleep.Set a bedtime and stick to it.Turn off all technology for 2 hours before bed. Read a book.Take a bathGet your room to the right temperature; not too cold, not too hot.Invest in a good mattress and some good pillows.Avoid caffeine.Eat carbs in your last meal before bed. (They won’t make you fat)Once your alarm is set, don’t look at your phone and turn your clock so you can’t see it.Drink some chamomile tea before bed.Sleep is underrated by a lot of people when it comes to their goals, but it could be the ace in the pack that helps you win or lose.#TrainSmartIf you have any question on this article or for getting a tailored program based on your starting point, please contact me through the link below.
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Rushe-Fitness/120518884715118EMMET RUSHE’S FITNESS COLUMN: SLEEP was last modified: April 5th, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:columnemmet rushefitnessimportance of sleepsleeplast_img read more