Will the ‘Internet of Things’ open your home to hackers?

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Jason GlassbergAt this week’s RSA Conference in San Francisco, the world’s leading cyber minds aren’t just focusing on international super-hackers and possible future attacks on the electric grid. Do you know what else they’re worrying about?Your home.With the explosion of “Internet of Things” products, devices, appliances and machinery (Gartner predicts 4.9 million “connected things” this year), everything from Amazon’s cute little “Dash” buttons to “smart” toilets, self-diagnosing refrigerators and self-driving cars, there is growing concern that this rush of technological sophistication and convenience could also have dire consequences for personal security.After all, security often appears to be the last thing manufacturers think about when rushing these tricked-out products to market. In many cases, they lack safeguards to prevent even basic attacks. Take for instance, the baby monitor hacks in Washington, Texas and Minnesota, or the keyless door lock break-ins at Arizona hotels, the key fob car hacks across the U.S. and a variety of other threats demonstrated at hacker conferences, from Barnaby Jack’s insulin pump attack to Charlie Miller’s hijack of a car’s steering and breaking systems.Of course, many of the most talked about (i.e., hyped) threats are the least likely to affect the average person, but they do raise some serious questions. In the race to win over our living rooms, are businesses leaving the front door open? continue reading »last_img read more