Tiger Woods struggles again in final round of Memorial

first_imgTiger Woods’s opening birdie bomb was followed by a long slog to a four-over par 76 on Sunday as the 15-time major champion wrapped up a tough week in his first tournament in five months at the Memorial. Woods, a five-time winner of the Jack Nicklaus-hosted event at Muirfield Village in Dublin, Ohio, made the cut on the number to keep his perfect streak of cuts made in the tournament in his 18th appearance. The 44-year-old reigning Masters champion was encouraged by a third-round 71, but could make nothing happen in a final round that included a double-bogey at the par-five seventh and five more bogeys – including a five-foot par miss at the 18th. His six-over total left him 18 off the lead held by Jon Rahm when Woods walked off the course. Birdies at 16 and 17 – with putts of 18 and 22 feet – were little consolation, but Woods insisted the week offered reasons for optimism. “I got four rounds in,” he said. ‘I was fortunate to make the weekend and made some progress ball striking-wise,” Woods said. “I’ve got to clean up on the greens,” added Woods. “I didn’t putt well all week. But as far as my swing, it felt good. I was able to hit good shots. Read Also: Hamilton to push F1 bosses for better anti-racism effort “We’ll see what happens in the near future,” Woods said. “Soon,” he promised with a smile. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 “I haven’t played in a while. It was nice to get my feet wet.” Woods hadn’t teed it up on the US PGA Tour since February, when a stiff back hindered him at the Genesis Open in Los Angeles. Continuing back trouble prompted him to sit out the Players Championship in March – which was halted mid-tournament because of the coronavirus pandemic, and Woods had opted to sit out the first five events of the tour’s restart in June. Woods, who could now find himself defending his Masters title in November under the revamped global golf calendar, was cagey about when he might tee it up next. Some pundits have suggested that could be at the World Golf Championships event in Memphis July 30-August 2, but Woods declined to confirm. “Friday was a bit off physically, but overall for my first week back, it was a lot, a lot of positives.center_img Loading… Promoted ContentThe Absolute 10 Greatest Shows In HBO History6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseTop 6 Iconic Supercar MoviesWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?last_img read more

New-look squads ready for rematch

first_imgNobody likes losing at home, and it’s even worse to be blown out. That’s exactly what the Ohio State Buckeyes did to the Wisconsin Badgers when they visited the Kohl Center last month.Wisconsin (18-8, 7-6 Big Ten) was embarrassed at home, losing by 23 points. Standout guard Jolene Anderson was the team’s only player in double figures, scoring 25 points.”The first time we played them, it was one and done,” Wisconsin head coach Lisa Stone said. “We took very fast shots. Our shot selection was poor. The poor shot selection filters through the team. If you get one in double figures, you’re lucky. We need some balanced scoring.””Obviously Jolene’s an awesome player,” freshman forward Mariah Dunham said. “She’s got a nose for the ball. We just all need to be around her and help her out when she’s working her butt off. We all need to step up our games.”Unlike the Badgers, the Buckeyes (23-1, 12-0 Big Ten) have not tasted defeat on their home court this year, posting a dominant 14-0 on the season. Dunham says her team realizes what Ohio State has been able to do at home, but they are ready for the test.”It’s definitely a challenge, but you’ve just got to rise up to the challenge,” Dunham said. “We just gotta compete. It is another game, but at the same time, we’re playing for something this year. It’s not just to get by. We definitely need to bring our game.”Stone hopes to learn lessons not only from the team’s prior meeting with OSU, but also from an earlier matchup with Indiana, in which her squad was forced into 20 turnovers. In both games, her players lacked patience on offense and found themselves forcing bad shots.”We’re a different team now,” Stone said. “I think we’re a little bit more patient offensively; we’re not taking as quick of shots. I think [there were] lessons learned at Indiana in terms of pressure defense causing us to have turnovers and then [taking] quick shots to try to get back in it. I think we’ve learned our lesson from that game.”The No. 4 Buckeyes will be without senior guard Brandie Hoskins, the team’s second leading scorer, who ranks eighth in the conference in scoring average with 14.3 points per game. Hoskins suffered a foot injury in the team’s game against Minnesota last Thursday and is out for the remainder of the season.”They’re still certainly very talented,” Stone said. “Certainly, she’s been instrumental in their success, and she’ll be a great professional player. “I would say that Brandie was their emotional leader. … They’re a little bit different, but they’re very, very talented. Their depth is a key reason as to why they’re as successful as they are.”Without Hoskins in the lineup for Jim Foster’s team, Ohio State will look for center Jessica Davenport to carry the load. The 6-foot-5 senior leads the Big Ten in scoring, averaging 19 points a game. Her defense is equally as intimidating, where she blocks 3.3 shots per game — the fifth best in the country. “She’s got a long wingspan, and she posts the block really strong,” UW forward Caitlin Gibson said. “She’s a target for them. She’s just an amazing player, and they work well together as a team, too.”Without Hoskins, however, Stone sees opportunities for other Buckeye players besides Davenport to step up and make an impact.”I think they always rely on Davenport,” Stone said. “I think they’re now relying on other people to fill the gaps. (Sophomore forward) Star Allen has picked up that area. Obviously, (junior guard) Marscilla Packer is unbelievable from 3-point range. They’ve got some nice depth inside. They’re balanced and they’re well-coached. We’re going to go in there full-strength and do the best that we can.”Realizing that the team came out flat in their previous game against the high-scoring Buckeyes, Dunham feels the Badgers’ mentality in this game will make the difference.”We just need to play team basketball,” Dunham said. “We definitely have to run the floor, and we definitely have to actually play defense this time. Last time we didn’t really accomplish any of our goals.”Tonight’s game will give the Badgers a chance to make a statement and perhaps even come away with an upset victory on the road.”The way we’re playing, I feel very good about our team and our chances,” Stone said. “We play to win every game we play.”last_img read more

PUL’s US$100,000 Case Reawakens

first_imgLiberian journalists under the banner, “Journalists Dignity,” have begun an advocacy for the prosecution of one of their former presidents—George Barpeen.The journalists are calling for Mr. Barpeen to account for US$100,000 donated by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf to the Press Union of Liberia about five years ago.The money was meant for the construction of PUL headquarters. Making their presence felt during celebration of World Press Freedom Day in Bopolu, Gbarpolu County on May 3, 2014, journalists including Eddie Harmon and J. Edwood N. Dennis assertively indicated that the misapplication of the money has dented the credibility of all journalists.The group said they are going to continue their advocacy until tangible result is established on how the money was handled.Speaking to the Daily Observer, broadcast Journalist Eddie Harmon said the fate of the money donated by President Sirleaf continues to be in limbo, and on many occasions journalists are attacked of corruption, receiving reproach that they are not credible to speak or write about corruption when they (journalists) themselves are corrupt and have embezzled the President’s donations to the Union.According to Journalist Harmon, this situation has a negative reflection on the media and all journalists in Liberia as they write and report corruption in high places.“We are all affected by this stigma of the misapplication of this US$100,000 and not George Barpeen alone.  You will be questioned about it as a journalist, and you will have to justify how the money was used,” Harmon noted.The case surrounding the US$100,000 is in court, but Mr. Harmon said considering the delay in adjudicating the case, it is better to turn it around by advocating for the indictment of the Press Union leadership that handled the money to account because if nothing is done, journalists’ credibility will continue to be questioned.According to him, the company that was contracted to construct the PUL headquarters now no longer exists. However, he disclosed that the company now uses different nomenclature, and as such it makes it uncertain for people to know whether the company can be traced. He failed to give the new name that the company now operates under.Harmon and Dennis in a collective view said the campaign is meant to mount pressure on the leadership of the PUL to push for the case and not to be dead as those connected to it allegedly want it to be.Other concerned journalists at the World Press Freedom Day in Bopolu joined the campaign by chanting slogan of the campaigners, calling for judicial probe into the matter to establish the status of the money.Reacting to the concern raised by the journalists, Press Union president K. Abdullai Kamara said expression of views about issue is one of the characteristics of free press and therefore does not have any problem with the campaign staged by the journalists during the World Press Freedom celebration.Mr. Kamara said his predecessors—George Barpeen to whom the money was given and Peter Quaqua, who also took the matter to court, had both given written statements about the fate of the money, and a committee is investigating the matter.He, however, assured that the company to which US$98,000 was given still exists and according to him, the company contends that the amount was small for the size of the building to be constructed.The PUL president said at the Union leadership level, they are embarking on the company to provide the money given because it is not doing the work for which the money was intended.He said the matter in court is about the cancellation of the contract between PUL and the unknown contractor, and that the judge is about to come out with a decision which makes it difficult for it (case) to be withdrawn from the court now.It can be recalled that President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf donated US$100,000 to the PUL for the construction of headquarter for the media umbrella organization.Former Press Union president George Barpeen amidst protests from some quarters for rejection of the gratuity defended that it was not an ethical breach for the Union to receive the money from the President as it was meant for development that will reflect the image of the country.Since the donation, the proposed site of the organization in Sinkor lies in ruin with no sign of development taking place there.The fate of the money has since been in limbo and the matter taken to court for cancellation of the contract.President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf during the installation of former president Peter Quaqua for the second term of office rhetorically praised the media for working hard to expose and report corruption in government, but raise concern about the US$100,000 in this way: “We recognize the role of the press in exposing corruption and reporting it as government has opened the enabling environment to exercise this freedom.  However, we still look up to the media to give us account for the US$100,000 given sometimes back to construct headquarters for the union.”This concern sparked up criticism among journalists against the leadership of George Barpeen with prejudice that hierarchies of the union had shared the money leaving the project undone. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Regional banks among targets for $30B GuySuCo financing

first_img…as negotiations continue to secure fundingThe $30 billion financing which the National Industrial and Commercial Investments Limited (NICIL) is seeking to continue operations at the Guyana Sugar Corporation (GuySuCo) is expected to come from sources that include regional banks.This is according to sources close to NICIL. However, when contacted, NICIL’s Public Relations Consultant, Alex Graham, noted that it was still too early to say exactly from where the funds would be garnered. He noted that negotiations are ongoing in this regard.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA“Some might be loans, some might be investments… The negotiations and discussions (are) now being conducted with a variety of banks and financial institutions. More than likely it won’t come from one (source),” he disclosed.It has recently emerged that NICIL’s Special Purpose Unit (SPU) was seeking some $30 billion in loans and investments to support its new ward — GuySuCo. It has also been related that this funding would cover a four-year period, and will provide capital and support infrastructure maintenance and upgrades at Albion, Blairmont and Uitvlugt. The funds are also expected to go towards developing new co-generation capacity for the estates’ operations and the national electricity grid.GuySuCo has a history of debt; at the end of 2015, the corporation owed $78.6 billion. As at January last year, that debt showed a marginal decrease to $77 billion. GuySuCo owes money to the National Insurance Scheme (NIS), the Guyana Revenue Authority, the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and other entities.One of NICIL’s first acts since assuming responsibility for GuySuCo has also been to abruptly end the life of the old Board of Directors. Coming out of a special board meeting, a decision was taken to have a new board installed as of February 14.The NICIL Board has also handed down instructions to GuySuCo to freeze all hiring. According to NICIL’s Public Relations Consultant Alex Graham, instructions have also been handed down to not renew any employee contract that is in the process of expiring.DDLThe Demerara Distillers Limited (DDL) had, in January, submitted an Expression of Interest (EoI) for the purchase of one of the estates. This was even as the SPU was seeking interested buyers for the Skeldon and Enmore estates.DDL, which produces the international award-winning El Dorado Rum, has raised concerns over Government’s plans to downsize the sugar sector. The company heavily depends on molasses for its production.It is understood that both the unit and DDL have been exploring the possibility of the company investing in the current crop at Enmore through advance payments on the molasses. Talks are also ongoing for DDL to participate in the management of the estate.The unit had expressed in a press release that PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), which has been blacklisted in India, has been evaluating GuySuCo’s assets and had raised concerns about the need to have the estates seen as “fully functioning operations and facilities”.This, it is understood, is because the company felt that closed estates would not attract the best of investors and prices. According to the unit, if approved by the NICIL Board, the DDL deal would allow the SPU to meet PwC’s recommendations.Government had moved to close the Enmore and Rose Hall sugar estates, as well as sell the Skeldon Sugar Factory. Government’s explanation for downsizing the industry has always been a need to cut costs.last_img read more