Tiger Woods struggles again in final round of Memorial

first_imgTiger Woods’s opening birdie bomb was followed by a long slog to a four-over par 76 on Sunday as the 15-time major champion wrapped up a tough week in his first tournament in five months at the Memorial. Woods, a five-time winner of the Jack Nicklaus-hosted event at Muirfield Village in Dublin, Ohio, made the cut on the number to keep his perfect streak of cuts made in the tournament in his 18th appearance. The 44-year-old reigning Masters champion was encouraged by a third-round 71, but could make nothing happen in a final round that included a double-bogey at the par-five seventh and five more bogeys – including a five-foot par miss at the 18th. His six-over total left him 18 off the lead held by Jon Rahm when Woods walked off the course. Birdies at 16 and 17 – with putts of 18 and 22 feet – were little consolation, but Woods insisted the week offered reasons for optimism. “I got four rounds in,” he said. ‘I was fortunate to make the weekend and made some progress ball striking-wise,” Woods said. “I’ve got to clean up on the greens,” added Woods. “I didn’t putt well all week. But as far as my swing, it felt good. I was able to hit good shots. Read Also: Hamilton to push F1 bosses for better anti-racism effort “We’ll see what happens in the near future,” Woods said. “Soon,” he promised with a smile. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 “I haven’t played in a while. It was nice to get my feet wet.” Woods hadn’t teed it up on the US PGA Tour since February, when a stiff back hindered him at the Genesis Open in Los Angeles. Continuing back trouble prompted him to sit out the Players Championship in March – which was halted mid-tournament because of the coronavirus pandemic, and Woods had opted to sit out the first five events of the tour’s restart in June. Woods, who could now find himself defending his Masters title in November under the revamped global golf calendar, was cagey about when he might tee it up next. Some pundits have suggested that could be at the World Golf Championships event in Memphis July 30-August 2, but Woods declined to confirm. “Friday was a bit off physically, but overall for my first week back, it was a lot, a lot of positives.center_img Loading… Promoted ContentThe Absolute 10 Greatest Shows In HBO History6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseTop 6 Iconic Supercar MoviesWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?last_img read more

Parejo asks his teammates not to gain weight these days

first_imgThe midfielder admitted that they can’t “go running, but we have a bike at home, in addition to doing functional and strength exercises to maintain physicality. ““We don’t know when the competition will resume, it’s all a bit up in the air, but when the competition resumes, it does not forgive “, he explained.He also called on society to follow “the measures that the state says strictly or in the end it will never end.”“We have to be realists, if you can only leave the house to go to the supermarket or to the pharmacy, then you cannot go out anymore. I would like to go to the park with my children. Either we all take it seriously or we are not going to go forward, right now we have to be a team, “he claimed. The captain of Valencia, Dani Parejohe asked his colleagues make an extra effort these days of confinement to return to training group when possible with the same weight they had when they stopped going to the sports city of Paterna due to the coronavirus crisis.“You have to be one hundred percent because winning a game costs a lot and you have to take it very seriously, not only training, but also food, arriving with a weight like the one you were in, that requires training and a lot of sacrifice, “the captain said in statements to the club’s website.last_img read more

Insurance premiums go up in smoke

first_imgCINCINNATI – Smokers already feeling pressure from increasing cigarette costs and workplace smoking bans are now feeling squeezed from another direction – health insurance premiums. A growing number of employers – private and public – are charging employees who use tobacco more money for their health insurance coverage. Employers hope that the higher charges will motivate more employees to stop smoking, resulting in improved health and lower health care costs for the companies and their workers. Meijer Inc., Gannett Co., American Financial Group Inc., PepsiCo Inc. and Northwest Airlines are among the companies already charging or planning to charge smokers higher premiums. The amounts range from about $20 to $50 a month. “With health care costs increasing by double digits in the last few years, employers are desperate to rein in costs to themselves and their employees,” said Linda Cushman, senior health care strategist with Hewitt Associates, a human resources consulting and services firm. Other companies or insurance plans have offered workers financial rewards for exercising, dieting or other healthy behaviors. Some have started on-site fitness programs and are paying for gym memberships. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates $92 billion in lost wages annually in the United States from smokers who die prematurely. In addition, the economic cost of smoking includes $75.5 billion per year in direct health care costs. “In addition to employers having to pay out more in health care costs, public opinion is now solidly on the side of eliminating smoking and workers are realizing increasingly that they are having to pay for others’ lifestyle choices,” said Helen Darling, president of the National Business Group on Health, a nonprofit agency representing more than 200 of the nation’s large employers. Gannett Co., the nation’s largest newspaper publisher, this year began charging its employees who smoke an extra $50 a month for the company’s insurance coverage. “We have some strong feelings that smoking is really bad for employees, and a healthier employee is better for us,” said Tara Connell, a spokeswoman for the McLean, Va.-based company. PepsiCo Inc., based in Purchase, N.Y., has been charging employees who use tobacco $100 annually for a couple of years, and Grand Rapids, Mich.-based Meijer Inc. started charging smokers $25 a month this year. That fee is dropped if smokers complete a smoking-cessation program, said Meijer spokeswoman Judith Clark. Cincinnati-based American Financial Group holding company and its subsidiaries waive the $37.92 monthly fee for a year if smokers make a good-faith effort and complete the company’s stop-smoking program, said Scott Beeken, a vice president with the Great American Insurance Group subsidiary. If the employee starts smoking, the fee would be reinstated the next year. About 35 workers were expected to enroll if the voluntary program had not included the financial incentive, but 325 have signed up so far. “The charge probably was a motivating factor,” Beeken said. Public employers also are requiring smokers to pay for their habit. The state of Alabama on Oct. 1 began charging $20 a month extra per employee insurance contract. The charge applies if anyone covered under a contract – such as a spouse – smokes. Georgia charges $40 a month for smokers covered under the state’s health plan. Employees caught lying on their insurance form about whether they smoke could lose their insurance for a year. The state health plan kept having cost overruns due to rising costs and high use, said Georgia state Sen. Tommie Williams, R-Lyons. “We know smokers cost more as far as health care goes,” said Gary Matthews, deputy administrator of the Alabama State Employees’ Insurance Board. “We are putting the burden on them to take responsibility for their own health.” Employers say the surcharges are incentives rather than penalties, but that’s not the way many smokers see it. “Where is it going to end?” asked Jim Clark, a smoker and owner of Strauss Tobacconist in Cincinnati. “Are they going to start saying you can’t wear a blue shirt on Monday or drive a green car on Thursday?” Lewis Maltby, president of the National Workrights Institute, says making smokers pay more for insurance and take more responsibility for their health choices is not inherently wrong, but he worries about the precedent the surcharges might set. “They could be the first step down a very dangerous road,” Maltby said. “Do we really want to live in a world where employers penalize us for everything in our private lives that isn’t healthy?” he said. Some employers have turned to even stronger measures to discourage smoking. Weyco Inc., an Okemos, Mich.-based medical benefits administrator, fires employees who smoke even if it is on their own time. Jim Wendling, a 45-year-old employee for Cincinnati-based Kroger Co., recently acknowledged on Kroger’s health survey that he is a smoker. Even though Kroger doesn’t charge smokers more for insurance, he fears that the survey could be the first step in that direction. “I personally don’t think a company should tell employees what to do when they are not at work,” Wendling said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant She said the practice of smoker surcharges is becoming such a significant trend that this year, it will be part of Hewitt’s annual survey of companies’ current and future health care plans. Cushman said a general benefits survey of 950 U.S.-based employers last year showed that at least 41 percent used some form of financial incentives or penalties in their health care plans. She estimates that at least 8 percent to 10 percent of the businesses probably aimed some of the incentives or penalties at smokers and says that percentage is growing. “With smokers costing companies about 25 percent more than nonsmokers in the area of health care, it just makes good business sense,” she said. The companies imposing the surcharges are mostly self-insured, with employers and employees sharing the insurance premium costs. last_img read more