Taylor-made! – Calabar star rewrites record books again

first_img With Tyreke Wilson missing due to injury, his Calabar teammate Dejour Russell seems to have little to be worried about where the Class Two Boys 100m gold medal is concerned. Russell followed Wilson to the line in a Calabar one-two at last year’s championships, but he is expected to boss the event this time around. He was certainly commanding in winning his heat yesterday afternoon, stopping the clock at 11.49 with little effort. He was still making his way back to the Stadium East area when Munro College’s AndrÈ Edwards posted 10.95 to win his heat and perhaps give the Calabar man something to think about, with JC’s Chislon Gordon, 11.06, and Gary Gordon (St Jago), 11.28, also advancing impressively. Top-billed Jamaica College (JC) pair of defending Class One triple jump champion, O’Brien Wasome, who already won gold in the Class One Boys’ long jump on Wednesday, and record holder Clayton Brown will take their rivalry into today’s final after both booked safe passage from yesterday’s preliminary round. Wasome won his section with a 14.61m effort ahead of Calabar man Javier Lowe, 14.38m, and Old Harbour’s Ryan Brown, 14.15m. Brown was third in his section with a mark of 14.47m, but there is a lot more in the tank. Jordan Scott (Campion), 15.04m, led all qualifiers, with Calabar’s Gabriel Allen, 14.49m, also doing well to qualify. St Jago’s Keenan Lawrence is the form athlete in the Class Two Boys’ 1500m, with many expecting him to seriously test Kemoy Campbell’s record of 3:58.06 set in 2007 He was comfortable in qualifying for the final, winning his heat in 4:12.98 ahead of Calabar’s Kimar Farquharson, who posted 4:13.40 for second place. St Elizabeth Technical’s Dwight Mason was, however, the fastest among the qualifiers, stopping the clock at 4:12.89. The Class One equivalent saw Rusea’s athlete Akeem Colley, who won his heat in a season’s best 4:05.40, registering the quickest time going into the final, with gold-medal favourite and defending champion Shevan Parkes finishing second in a time of 4:06.01. Samara Spencer of Hydel High leads all qualifiers into tomorrow’s final of the Class One long jump – set for 4:53 p.m. – after registering a huge season best of 6.04 metres during yesterday’s prelims. Excelsior will seek to continue their fine showing at this year’s championships in the Class Four high jump final as their duo of Shantae Foreman and Daniel Harris both cleared 1.55m, with gold-medal favourite Foreman doing so on her first attempt. Amelia Davis of Wolmer’s Girl led six others who cleared 1.50m. Calabar will have to work deep into Saturday night if they are to retain their title, but they certainly have the tools to do so. “I am not perturbed. We still have enough depth to go on and win,” said Calabar’s head coach Michael Clarke. Taylor, who already helped himself to the 400m record on Tuesday, was clearly not satisfied as he powered through the line in his Class Two Boys’ 200m semi-final, stopping the clock at 20.80, which betters another Calabar man – Ramone McKenzie’s 20.89 run in 2007. His schoolmate, Dejour Russell, followed up that run with an impressive one of his own, clocking 21.08 to win his semi-final, knowing very well that the defending champions will be banking heavily on maximising points in this event in tomorrow’s final. Herbert Morrison scored an unlikely one-two in the Boys’ Class Three high jump final, pushing with gold-medal winner Antonio Hanson and his teammate, Javeir Hall, both clearing 1.85m, in the process pushing pre-Champs favourite Lamar Reid (Calabar), 1.75m into third place. Edwin Allen High’s Janique Burgher won the Class Three girl’s high jump event after clearing 1.70m ahead of Shauntia Davidson (Hydel), 1.65m, and Excelsior’s Kaliah Jones, who also cleared 1.65m. In a closely contested girls Class Four long jump final, St Jago’ Dayshanae Hall took home the gold with a 5.17m leap, finishing ahead of Edwin Allen’s Paula-Ann Chambers, 5.14m, and Excelsior’s Samoya Neil, 5.13m. Petersfield’s Sanjae Lawrence took gold in the Class One Boys’ discus event with a 53.90m heave to get the better of Excelsior’s Phillip Barnett, 53.78m, and Calabar’s Warren Barrett, who would have been disappointed with his 52.88m bronze-medal mark. The Boys’ Class Two shot put title was won by Petersfield’s Daniel Cope, with a distance of 16.81m. Second place went to Meadowbrook’s Cobe Graham, 16.22m, with another Petersfield athlete, Courtney Lawrence, 15.62m, taking third. Michael Campbell (JC), who clocked 10.83, and Jhevaughn Matherson (KC), 10.95, both dipped below 11 seconds despite a strong headwind in the Class One Boys’ 100m, with other podium contenders Raheem Chambers (St Jago), 11.02, and Nigel Ellis (St Elizabeth), 11.04, also looking comfortable in qualifying to today’s semi-finals. CLASS TWO’S DEJOUR RUSSELL RETAIN TITLE Kingston College (KC) continue to go about their business in a workmanlike manner; Calabar High had another so-so day; Christopher Taylor is at it again; and the Edwin Allen machine is cranking into high gear. The ISSA-GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletic Championships had its fair share of high points yesterday, and with today’s penultimate day of competition promising major excitement with the 100m finals and key hurdles and field events battles, it’s the KC faithful who are happiest at this stage. The boys from North Street lead the way with 37 points, with Jamaica College (JC) keeping them company with 33.5. Petersfield High’s team has impressed all week and they are currently third on 28 points, with St Jago as next best on 24, and defending champions Calabar in fifth with 23.5 points. Edwin Allen have been hitting the right keys so far, hardly putting a foot wrong since the opening day of competition. They are on course to defend their Girls’ title with 47 points after six events, 14 ahead of Hydel, with Excelsior in third place on 26 points. Holmwood (24) and St Jago (23) round out the top five.last_img read more

Prosecutor points to history of violence

first_img“I think I just killed somebody,” Spector said, according to what DeSouza told police. Photos of Clarkson’s body lying stiffly across a chair, a bloody hole where her mouth used to be, were shown several times during the first day of the trial. Jackson recalled nights of terror as recounted by four onetime women friends of Spector in which he allegedly “flew off the handle” when they asked to leave and threatened them with guns, making some stay the night. Spector sat quietly in court, looking subdued even while sporting wild attire. He was wearing a three-piece tan suit with the collar of a fuchsia shirt hiding part of his pale face. His hands shook, and he stared blankly ahead throughout most of the day, occasionally shaking his head slowly back and forth as Jackson spoke. At one point, he stared straight at Jackson for several minutes. Two of the four final incidents with his women friends happened in the early 1990s in Spector’s former Pasadena home along the Arroyo Seco, Jackson said. Spector had known both of those women for several years and had a “casual dating relationship” with them, Jackson said. While the women described Spector as “charming” during their courtship, their relationships with the music mogul always ended with a night at Spector’s home in which he would seemingly snap, giving them orders to stay, using profanity and, eventually, a weapon, the prosecutor said. Jackson told the story of Dorothy Melvin, former personal manager for comedian Joan Rivers, who dated Spector from 1989 until the Fourth of July weekend of 1993. Melvin, who had spent the night on the couch at Spector’s Pasadena home, awoke to find him standing outside, wearing a shoulder holster and pointing a pistol at her car, Jackson said. When Melvin came out to ask him what he was doing, Spector allegedly slapped her with the back of his hand, asking where she had been and claiming he couldn’t find her. Jackson said Spector kept the gun pointed at her while ordering her to “get the \ back in the house.” She cried and begged Spector to let her leave, which he eventually did, but he made her leave her purse behind, Jackson said. He was convinced she had stolen from him. While making her way down the driveway, Melvin realized the wrought-iron gates to Spector’s driveway were closed. She said she heard Spector coming after her and turned to find him holding a shotgun to her face and saying, “I told you to get the \ out of here.” She explained the gate was closed, and he let her out. Melvin called Pasadena police, who took reports that Jackson showed on an overhead projector Wednesday. Jackson said Melvin was unwilling to press charges because she wanted to keep Rivers’ name out of the tabloids. Defense attorney Bruce Cutler said in his opening statement that the evidence will show the shooting was a “tragic accident.” Cutler also charged that investigators leaped to the conclusion that it was a murder. “The evidence will show that back on Feb. 3 of ’03, before they even had a cause of death, let alone a manner of death, they had murder on their mind. Murder on their mind – the police,” Cutler said. The attorney also cast doubt on the language abilities and awareness of a chauffeur who quoted Spector as saying he thought he killed somebody. Addressing Spector’s history with women, Cutler characterized him as “a true romantic of a bygone era.” Cutler’s opening was nearly aborted by a dispute in which he said his theory of the case was being “eviscerated” by the prosecution. Prosecutors Pat Dixon and Jackson approached the judge before Cutler spoke and asked that Cutler be prevented from referring to statements Spector made to police shortly after the shooting. In the taped statements, Spector said he didn’t know Clarkson and railed that “she had no right to come to my house and blow her head off.” The judge said that since the prosecution chose not to use them they can’t be used by the defense. Dixon said the issue was mentioned at a pretrial hearing and was not a surprise. Cutler went forward before the jury, stating evidence will show “the decedent fired the gun herself.” “A self-inflicted gunshot wound can be accidental suicide and that’s what it was,” he said. Cutler attacked the credibility of the women who will testify saying they are telling “tall tales” and said they pursued Spector because of his fame and money. The trial continues today. The Associated Press contributed to this story. [email protected] (626) 578-6300, Ext. 4496160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! • Photo Gallery: Phil Spector trial LOS ANGELES – Famed music producer Phil Spector often used guns to threaten women who tried to leave his home after a night of drinking, a prosecutor told jurors Wednesday. So it should come as no surprise that actress Lana Clarkson had a purse around her right shoulder, apparently ready to take her leave, as she lay shot to death in a chair just five feet from the back door of Spector’s Alhambra mansion, Los Angeles County Deputy District Attorney Alan Jackson said. “The man put a loaded pistol inside Lana Clarkson’s mouth – inside her mouth – and shot her to death,” Jackson said during the prosecution’s opening statements in Los Angeles Superior Court. Spector is charged with murder in the Feb. 3, 2003, shooting death of 40-year-old Clarkson, best known for her role in the 1985 Roger Corman film “Barbarian Queen.” Spector was indicted by a grand jury on Sept. 20, 2004, and has pleaded not guilty. He has remained free on $1 million bail since his arrest after the shooting at the estate he calls “The Castle” at 1700 Grandview Ave. in Alhambra. If convicted of second-degree murder, he could be sentenced to 15 years to life in prison. Spector, 67, known for creating the “Wall of Sound” production style showcased in the 1963 Ronettes hit “Be My Baby,” has maintained his innocence, saying Clarkson killed herself. But Jackson was quick to recall for the jury what Spector is said to have uttered to his driver Adriano DeSouza, who was sitting in the producer’s Mercedes when Spector emerged from the back door around 5 a.m., pistol in hand and blood running through his fingers. last_img read more