Dai Young to coach the Barbarians against the Lions in Hong Kong

first_imgBATH, ENGLAND – APRIL 21: Dai Young, the Wasps head coach looks on during the Aviva Premiership match between Bath and London Wasps at the Recreation Ground on April 21, 2012 in Bath, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Heading to Hong Kong: Dai Young toured with the British & Irish Lions in 1989, 1997 and 2001LONDON WASPS head coach Dai Young will lead the Barbarians in their historic match against the British & Irish Lions next summer, in the first match of the Lions 2013 tour at Hong Kong Stadium.Young went on three Lions tours in 1989, 1997 and 2001, making him the only player to have ever represented the Lions across three decades. The prop won over 50 caps for Wales during his playing career and after eight years coaching with the Cardiff Blues joined London Wasps in 2011, narrowly avoiding relegation on the final day of the season.Young worked with the Barbarians in 2011, leading them to victory over both England and Wales. He will take charge for the whole of the Barbarians summer tour, which begins by facing England at Twickenham on 26 May.“I have been privileged to coach the Barbarians on three previous summer tours in recent years but never mind how many times I am invited it is always an honour and one that I cherish. “This will be even more so next summer. The annual game against England is a big enough occasion it itself but to play the Lions on the first match of their own major tour is really a case of the icing on the cake. It promises to be a tremendous tour and all those of us involved will be committed to making it a big success.” “It is also a big responsibility to uphold the traditions of the Barbarians and to get the best out of the fantastic group of players they invariably assemble for these matches. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Italy v Scotland Talking Points from Rome

first_imgMagician strikes againBy then Minozzi had already registered a try for the fourth successive Six Nations match – the first Italian to do so – after an agile gather from Tommaso Allan’s grubber kick. Be sure to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Hammer blow: Stuart Hogg scores Scotland’s bonus-point try to inflict further misery on Italy (Getty) The key talking points from Scotland’s 29-27 win against Italy in the 2018 Six Nations LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img “He’s a crackerjack of a player,” said ex-Scotland centre Scott Hastings in his TV commentary.Allan, a former Scotland U20 player, also ghosted through himself and with two conversions and a penalty, Italy led 17-12 at the break.Scotland’s saviourFraser Brown’s try, from a long pass by the indefatigable Hamish Watson, got Scotland off the mark on nine minutes but it was quickly apparent that they were below their usual standard.When they needed comfort they found it in their maul. After Alessandro Zanni was penalised for not rolling away, Russell kicked to the corner and John Barclay touched down from the drive.Trailing 24-12 in the second half, they engineered a try for Sean Maitland from a penalty advantage that came from another drive.Through the gap: Sean Maitland scores his ninth Test try to close the deficit on the hour mark (Getty)Then, after Stuart Hogg ran in his 18th try in 60 Scotland Tests and Allan kicked a 76th-minute penalty after Jonny Gray got stuck on the wrong side at a ruck, Scotland went to the well one last time.This time Italy collapsed the Scottish maul and Laidlaw, as cool a head as you could wish for in such circumstances, stepped up to win the match for Scotland. It’s not the first time Italy have succumbed at the death to a Scottish boot, with Chris Paterson’s penalty (2006) and Duncan Weir’s drop-goal (2014) other occasions when the Azzurri were cruelly thwarted.Even after Laidlaw’s strike, however, Italy regained the ball at the restart to launch a final attack, but Braam Steyn’s knock-on crushed their hopes of ending their long losing run in the tournament.Upward trajectoryItaly’s performance showed just how squarely they are behind the management team headed up by Conor O’Shea. They have moved on from their dismal possession stats earlier in the tournament, with a creditable 47% possession and only 13 fewer carries than Scotland.Their tackle accuracy (89%) also improved, their lineout was flawless (if cautious) and the third-minute scrum, in which Scotland were sent hurtling backwards, was something you don’t see too often in international rugby.Ground work: John Barclay burrows over from close range to reward a deadly Scottish maul (Getty)Sadly for Italy, the precision required to convert opportunities wasn’t quite there. They scored three tries but the thrust and energy of their forwards demanded even more.Their maul defence wasn’t up to the job either but let’s give credit here to Scotland forwards coach Dan McFarland. Amid all the pizzazz of the back-line, it’s easy to forget that sometimes it’s Scotland’s forward pack that gets the job done.Scotland, too, will point to the disruption caused by Russell’s injury, which forced Laidlaw to shift to ten for almost 30 minutes of the match. It came at a time when Italy had the ascendency and victory from such an unpromising position must be viewed as a feather in Scotland’s cap. Previous Scottish sides might not have found a way to prevail.“It’s great to pick up an away win, to finish with three wins,” said Scotland coach Gregor Townsend. “Today’s game will be as valuable as the win against England in terms of experience this group has and being able to beat teams when you’re not playing your best. Our fitness was a big factor.“To get three wins in such a competitive championship is okay. But we want to do better than that. We still have a long way to go to reach our potential.”Encouraging start: Gregor Townsend matched Vern Cotter’s three Six Nations wins from 2017 (Inpho)Italy – Tries Allan 2, Minozzi. Cons Allan 3. Pens Allan 2.Scotland – Tries Brown, Barclay, Maitland, Hogg. Cons Laidlaw 3. Pen Laidlaw. Italy Matteo Minozzi; Tommaso Benvenuti (Jayden Hayward 58), Giulio Bisegni, Tommaso Castello (Carlo Canna 73), Mattia Bellini; Tommaso Allan, Marcello Violi (Guglielmo Palazzani 66); Andrea Lovotti (Nicola Quaglio 58), Leonardo Ghiraldini (Oliviero Fabiani 76), Simone Ferrari (Tiziani Pasquali 59), Alessandro Zanni (Abraham Steyn 52), Dean Budd, Sebastian Negri, Jake Polledri (Giovanni Licata 66), Sergio Parisse (capt).Scotland Stuart Hogg; Tommy Seymour, Huw Jones (Pete Horne 52), Nic Grigg, Sean Maitland; Finn Russell (Ali Price 53), Greig Laidlaw; Gordon Reid (Jamie Bhatti ht), Fraser Brown (Stuart McInally ht), WP Nel (Zander Fagerson ht), Jonny Gray, Tim Swinson (Richie Gray 52), John Barclay (capt), Hamish Watson, Ryan Wilson (David Denton 66). Italy v Scotland Talking Points from RomeThis was a belting match to launch Super Saturday, with Scotland having to twice come from 12 points down, as well as cope with falling behind again with five minutes remaining, before gaining the victory that had been expected.The cold fact is that Italy lost for the 17th successive time in a Six Nations match, equalling the record held by the France team of 1911-20, but this at last was a performance of real grit and fire.In their best display of this year’s championship, they at times had the Scots completely rattled but they were left to rue missed opportunities either side of half-time.Ultimately Scotland had the composure to claw their way back for a win that takes them back to fifth in the world rankings, leapfrogging South Africa. Greig Laidlaw has scored more than 600 points for his country and the three he landed in the 79th minute proved decisive.Coupled with the result at Twickenham, it means Scotland have finished above England in the championship table for the first time since 2006.For Italy, there is at least the consolation of a first-ever bonus point but it will feel very hollow on a day when far greater reward beckoned.Here are the main talking points from the match in Rome…Pointing the way: Greig Laidlaw and Stuart Hogg celebrate after Scotland’s dramatic win (Getty)Fire and brimstoneItaly always seem to play with extra belief when they play Scotland, a side they have beaten several times before, and their forwards ripped into the visitors.Tighthead Simone Ferrari set the tone with a powerful run and then a great tackle on Nick Grigg, but this was a true team effort. Dean Budd was terrific in the second row and the back-row bruisers Sebastian Negri and Jake Polledri were magnificent.Polledri, making his Test debut a year on from playing third-tier rugby in England, consistently won the collisions and he had made 11 carries and nine tackles by the time he was subbed off late on. He also achieved a morale-boosting steal near his line and made the bust from which Tommaso Allan scored his second try in the 44th minute.The conversion made it 24-12 and a failure to build on that, when they had all the momentum, is what cost Italy the game.Clean through: Tommaso Allan scores Italy’s first try. He was later named Man of the Match (Getty)Points squanderedThe Azzurri were undone by a mix of poor execution, misfortune and breakdown indiscipline that enabled Scotland to bite off huge chunks of territory and bring their driving maul into play.Soon after Allan’s second try, Italy looked certain to score after some brilliant offloading by Budd and Leonardo Ghiraldini, but the pass from Sergio Parisse went to ground.Italy’s captain, making his 65th championship appearance, equalling the record held by Brian O’Driscoll, appealed for a knock-on by Finn Russell but the TV evidence was inconclusive.Green grass: Matteo Minozzi latches on to Allan’s grubber kick to extend Italy’s lead to 17-5 (Getty)It was yet another disappointing outcome for Parisse, who a few minutes earlier had seen a try by Negri disallowed after Parisse’s pass to Tommaso Castello went slightly behind the centre and was knocked on.Just as damaging, perhaps, was Italy’s failure to pass to Matteo Minozzi in the final play of the first half when he would have had a one-on-one with Tommy Seymour. Such are Minozzi’s footwork skills that most would have backed the Italian full-back.last_img read more

Gallagher Premiership Players To Watch

first_imgIn this piece we take a look at which players you should be keeping an eye on in this upcoming season. Surplus to requirement at the Scarlets, Josh Adams headed to Sixways to establish himself and the past 12 months have been something of a breakthrough. The Premiership’s joint top try-scorer with 13 last season, he is now a Wales international and scored a fine try against Argentina in June.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter for all the latest news regarding the Gallagher Premiership. Gallagher Premiership Players To WatchWith the new season set to begin, at Rugby World we have put together this piece looking at one player to watch for each team competing in the Gallagher Premiership.Is there anyone you think we have missed?BATHWhat do you do when you jettison long-serving giant-on-the-wing Matt Banahan? Simple, replace him with a similarly-sized model, a decade younger. Step forward Joe Cokanasiga, who has joined from London Irish with a growing highlights reel. Time will tell if he’s a worthy replacement.BRISTOL BEARSAll eyes will be on Charles Piutau. Billed as the highest-paid player in the league and having shone for Wasps in the Premiership, the former All Black has plenty of Bears fans and neutrals expecting excitement. The people want flashing feet from the full-back.EXETER CHIEFSHe’s no ‘young gun’ but it will be interesting to see how Alex Cuthbert fares in Devon. Exeter are renowned for plucking players from other clubs and getting them to perform at a high level. Will they be able to do the same with Cuthbert, who suffered a slump in form in the Welsh goldfish bowl?GLOUCESTERThere is a band of bright young things at Glaws, with forwards Lewis Ludlow and Jake Polledri already impressing. But the re-emergence of centre Henry Trinder, 29, is something to get locals and casuals buzzing.Related: 2018/19 Gallagher Premiership Fixture ListHARLEQUINSOnly Worcester and London Irish scored fewer tries than Quins (58) in the league last season and Gabriel Ibitoye could be just the man to improve their strike rate. The winger has produced athletic finishes for England U20 and now needs to do the same for his club.LEICESTER TIGERSBig things are expected of Will Evans, 21, who won the 2016 Junior World Cup with England U20. The back-row’s work-rate is superb and he links effectively. If he has better luck with injuries, he could be a first-team regular. Kiwi: Charles Piutau is one to watch for Bristol this year (Getty Images) center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS NEWCASTLE FALCONSBack-rower Gary Graham came roaring into form at the tail-end of the season, and he is thriving amongst fellow diggers Will Welch, Will Witty, Mark Wilson and Callum Chick. That back five of the pack could really grow.NORTHAMPTON SAINTSDan Biggar, the Pro14’s record point-scorer, is tasked with revitalising an uninspired back-line. As an arch competitor, the Wales fly-half will be looking to remind Warren Gatland of his worth.SALE SHARKSTom Curry turned 20 on England’s tour of South Africa, where he was one of Eddie Jones’s standout players in a disappointing series. The flanker’s power in the tackle, scavenging ability on the deck and aggression in the tight mark him out as a player of pedigree.SARACENSNick Isiekwe may have bad memories of England’s tour to South Africa, but with Saracens he really came of age last season, becoming a must-pick in the back five. Versatile and relentless, he has a lot of eyes on him now.WASPSNizaam Carr made such an impact during a loan spell last season that he signed a long-term deal at Wasps. With Nathan Hughes and Brad Shields likely to be away on England duty, Carr could become the key figure in their back row.WORCESTER WARRIORSlast_img read more

Saracens beat Leinster to be crowned European champions

first_img Saracens beat Leinster to be crowned European champions The adage goes that defence wins championships and so it proved in the European Champions Cup final at St James’ Park.The two outstanding teams in Europe went head-to-head at the home of Newcastle United and it was Saracens who came out on top, beating Leinster 20-10. The key to the victory? Their famous defence.The Irish province simply couldn’t find a way through. They had plenty of possession, particularly in the first half, but couldn’t make the necessary territory gains.In fact, Saracens’ defensive line moved at such speed that they often drove Leinster back across the gain-line and the Irish province couldn’t make yards or build momentum.Leading the defence: Garry Ringrose is closed down by Brad Barritt (Getty Images)The last five minutes were a case in point as Leinster struggled to escape their own 22 when they needed two scores to have a chance of winning. Brad Barritt in midfield led that defensive shift and was a deserving Man of the Match.The one time Leinster did break that Saracens defence came after half an hour. Rob Kearney caused those defenders to flounder – a rare occurrence – when he cut a decent angle inside in the 28th minute before being brought down just a couple of metres out.Acute angle: Rob Kearney cuts inside the Saracens defence (Getty Images)A few phases later it looked like Leinster may finally have scored and the TMO was called upon. The ball was held up but with Maro Itoje then sent to the sin-bin for two offside offences and two new props on the field for Saracens due to injuries, Leinster opted for a scrum from the resulting penalty and Tadhg Furlong squeezed over after a Jack Conan burst. Then came the converted try once the clock had ticked past 40 that drew the scores level at 10-10. Saracens used a penalty to set up a lineout in Leinster’s 22 and after using their big carriers to take play close to the line, drawing in numerous defenders, Farrell flicked on a pass to Sean Maitland on the wing for an easy run-in.Line time: Sean Maitland touches down for Saracens’ first try (Getty Images)It was nip-tuck for the first half of the second period before Jackson Wray burst into open space and Saracens worked their way close to the Leinster line. Similar to the first half, the TMO was called in, there was no clear grounding and Scott Fardy was sent to the sin-bin. Sarries opted for the posts to secure a narrow lead.In reach: Billy Vunipola stretches out to score for Saracens (Getty Images)They capitalised on their numerical advantage a few minutes later too. Getting close to the line again and putting pressure on Leinster from a series of five-metre scrums before Billy Vunipola surged from the back then stretched over to touch the ball down under the posts.At 20-10, it was advantage Saracens – and they held on for victory.To add a cherry to the icing on the Saracens cake, full-back Alex Goode was then named European Player of the Year.Leinster – Try: Furlong. Con: Sexton. Pen: Sexton. English side lift European Champions Cup trophy for a third time Saracens’ powerful defence helped to deliver their first points late in the second half. Two huge tackles led to a penalty – first Alex Lozowski on Jack Conan and then George Kruis on Johnny Sexton – and Owen Farrell put the ball through the posts. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: LeinsterSaracens Saracens – Tries: Maitland, B Vunipola. Cons: Farrell 2. Pens: Farrell 2.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Who is Felix Jones: Ten things you should know about the Springbok assistant coach

first_img Who is Felix Jones: Ten things you should know about the Springboks assistant coachFelix Jones is a former Munster and Ireland full-back who is currently working as an assistant coach for the Springboks.Here are a few more facts and stats about the South Africa assistant coach.Ten things you should know about Felix Jones1. Jones was born on 5 August 1987 in Dublin. He attended St Andrew’s College and subsequently earned selection for the Ireland U20 side in 2007.2. Jones had a brief stint with Leinster before moving on to Munster, where he spent the last six years of his relatively short professional career. The full-back was part of the Munster side that won the 2010-11 Magners League.3. Jones played 13 Tests for Ireland between 2011 and 2015. He was part of the Ireland side that won the Six Nations in 2015.Felix Jones scores a try for Ireland against Georgia (Sportsfile/Getty Images)4. In late 2015, Jones was forced to retire from the game at the age of 28. Medical staff advised the talented full-back to hang up his boots after he sustained a serious neck injury in a Pro12 match between Munster and Glasgow.5. Jones holds a Master’s degree in Sport, Exercise and Performance Psychology from the University of Limerick.Related: Felix Jones on how to read the game from full-back Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. 6. Jones pursued a career in coaching after retiring. He impressed during his first season with Munster in 2016-17, where he worked with South African duo Rassie Erasmus and Jacques Nienaber.Jones was subsequently drafted into the Ireland coaching team as a consultant.7. When Springbok attack coach Swys de Bruin stepped down in 2019, Erasmus moved to secure Jones’s services – albeit as an extra defence coach – ahead of the Rugby World Cup in Japan.The Bok coaches and players hailed Jones’s eye for detail, and felt that the Irishman was more than deserving of his World Cup winner’s medal.8. The tournament in Japan marked Jones’s first appearance at a World Cup. He missed the 2011 edition in New Zealand due to injury and was overlooked by Ireland coach Joe Schimdt for the 2015 global showpiece in England.9. The Springboks enjoyed a week-long trophy tour upon their return to South Africa. It was atop the team bus where Erasmus, Nienaber, Jones and head of athletic performance Aled Walters linked arms and sang a familiar Irish rugby anthem, ‘Stand Up and Fight’. All four men worked at Munster in 2016 and 2017 before making the move to the Boks.10. Jones continues to work with the Springbok coaching team – albeit from his base in Dublin. He has been mandated by Erasmus to monitor the South African players competing in the leagues across the United Kingdom and Europe. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Felix Jones gets stuck into South Africa training at RWC 2019 (Sportsfile/Getty Images) Jon Cardinelli reports on the former Ireland full-back’s journey to the South Africa set-uplast_img read more

Standing with Kivalina at the 77th General Convention

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA General Convention 2012 Environment & Climate Change, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments (2) General Convention, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 2, 2012 at 12:15 pm I am glad to see this issue receive attention in ENS and I’m grateful for this article. I spent several wonderful years in Nome, Alaska and while I have not visited Kivalina, I have visited Shishmaref, another village facing similar issues, and have spoken with Alaska natives in many other villages affected by erosion. It’s clear to me that this is an issue with profound religious and spiritual dimensions and is something to be addressed by all Episcopalians, not to mention all Christians. We are one body and when one part of the body suffers, we all suffer. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA July 10, 2012 at 1:08 pm We are constantly being tested in ways that we may not consider “religious” at all, but may have far more significance than we imagine. I suspect that how we actually live reveals what we REALLY believe. I pray for the grace that I–indeed, all of us–may grow into a faith deeper than what is convenient or politically or economically advantageous. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ By P. Joshua GriffinPosted Jun 29, 2012 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments are closed. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Janet Mitchell, the Rev. Joshua Griffin Griff and Colleen Swan. Mitchell and Swan are both lifetime members of Kivalina Epiphany Church, granddaughters of the late Rev. Clinton Swan, and members of Episcopal Church Women.[Episcopal News Service] As forest fires rage across Colorado and unprecedented storms pummel the country from Florida to Minnesota, it’s pretty clear we are facing a “new normal.” It’s also increasingly obvious that climate change is not so much about future generations as it is about our most marginalized brothers and sisters, right here, right now.This unfortunate truth is well known about one hundred miles above the Arctic Circle within the Iñupiaq community of Kivalina, Alaska, a village of 400 persons and home to the Kivalina Epiphany Church. “We’re an adaptable people, we’ve always been,” recalls Colleen Swan, who served as tribal administrator for 18 years, now sits on the Kivalina City Council, and serves as treasurer for Episcopal Church Women. “But since 2004 we just can’t adapt this fast.” That was the year when Kivalina started to experience rapid land failure—a story covered here by the Episcopal Digital Network, Wayfarer Project.Perched atop a barrier island, the village sits between a freshwater lagoon to the east and the Chukchi Sea to the west. With sea ice forming later and later each year, Kivalina is washing away from seasonal fall storms. Flooding remains a terrifying risk and traditional hunting grounds are increasingly unreliable. But community leaders in Kivalina are determined not to become “climate refugees” and have chosen relocation over nonexistence.The Rev. Enoch Adams Jr. chairs the Kivalina Relocation Planning Committee, which is tasked with moving the community so as to save his peoples’ place-based culture and human identity. “We get a lot of sympathy from a lot of people,” he told me, “but what we need is empathy.” With the construction of the first school in 1905, the federal government forced an autonomous and semi-nomadic society, the Kivalliñigmiut, to settle on what had been a summer hunting camp. Despite its role in the forced sedentarization and assimilation of Kivalina’s people, U.S. government support remains unavailable for climate-induced relocation projects.As General Convention deputies, the Rev. Enoch Adams Jr. and Austin Swan Sr., a village elder, will carry the concerns of their people to Indianapolis. “It’s about time,” Enoch said, “we’ve been waiting for so long to find an ally and we couldn’t find it anywhere. Not in government agencies… in nobody at all. It’s the church, it’s really incumbent on the church, I think, to take the lead on this.”In a few short days, the Episcopal Church will have an opportunity to do just that—to affirm our commitment to Kivalina and other environmentally vulnerable communities around the world. In faithfulness to the House of Bishops recent Pastoral Teaching on the environment and sent by their parish mission committee, the Kivalina deputation will introduce a resolution that asks the Episcopal Church to pledge its solidarity with “overburdened ‘frontline’ communities… already experiencing the impacts of climate change.”But the proposed resolution goes one step further.Seizing upon novel conditions, made possible only through global warming, Shell will begin offshore oil exploration in the Arctic later this month. The logic of “manifest destiny” embedded in our fossil fuel economy has carried Shell to the Chukchi Sea, threatening a critical food source and the migration routes of the bowhead whale, central to Kivalina’s Iñupiaq spirituality. The threats posed to culture, ecology, health—to human and ecological dignity—by the growth of an economy powered by fossil fuel are unspeakable.In submitting this resolution, the members of Kivalina Epiphany Church were emboldened by the 2009 General Convention’s repudiation of the Doctrine of Discovery. “I’m glad the Doctrine of Discovery concept was struck down when it was,” Enoch stated. “It is like God told somebody to write this stuff down so that when we reach an issue like oil discovery up here, we have a means to help people understand where we’re coming from when we oppose oil exploration in our waters.”At this year’s convention, the Kivalina deputation and their allies will do the world a great service when they ask the church to commit to the kind of transition we badly need. The resolution calls on the Episcopal Church to resist not only offshore oil extraction, but all forms of increasingly unconventional and destructive fossil fuel development: strip-mining for coal in Appalachia and the Intermountain West, tar-sands oil development in Canada and Utah and “fracking” for methane gas throughout the U.S.For indigenous cultures throughout the world there is a direct link between the violence of colonial racism and an endlessly expanding fossil fuel economy. The Rev. Enoch Adams Jr. calls us to another way: “I saw this repudiation and I knew that God’s hand was on it. Now the church has got to give it backbone. People are going to have to sacrifice their way of thinking, to repent. If they want to see this, to understand this, to know where we’re coming from, they’re going to need to repent. That’s why I started pointing out the difference between sympathy and empathy. Sympathy requires nothing. I refuse to seek anybody’s sympathy. Come and live, come and see, take a look… live every day with the fear that what you’ve been using all your life could be gone. Something that you took for granted all your life, [and] all of a sudden its possible that it will not be there next year. And that’s the gravity of the situation, my friend. I just want to do God’s will.”— The Rev. P. Joshua Griffin, priest Associate at St. David of Wales Episcopal Church in Portland, Oregon. “Griff” received his M.Div. from Harvard Divinity School in 2009 and is a doctoral student in cultural and environmental anthropology at the University of Washington. He previously served as the environmental justice missioner for the Diocese of California. Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Standing with Kivalina at the 77th General Convention Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Jesse Zink says: Rector Knoxville, TN Eleanor Forfang-Brockman says: Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

RIP: James R. Lenney

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Posted Jun 24, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Obituary, Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release People Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing RIP: James R. Lenney Trinity Cranford’s choral music patriarch for 60 years Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Trinity Episcopal Church] James R. Lenney, 85, an active and long time Cranford resident, died June 16, 2013 following a brief illness at Overlook Hospital. A Memorial Service will be held Friday, August 9, at 2pm at Trinity Episcopal Church of Cranford, New Jersey, located at the corner of Forest and North Avenues.Born and raised in Staten Island, Mr. Lenney graduated from Port Richmond High School 1946, NYU 1950 with a BA and 1957 with his MA in music education. Post graduate work included NYU, Seton Hall, Kean Universities as well as Westminster Choir College.Mr. Lenney faithfully served the community for 60 years, inspiring everyone he taught to reach their greatest potential, in music-making and in living life honorably. Mr. Lenney began teaching in Cranford during the 1952-1953 school year and served as music teacher, Director of Choral Activities at Cranford High School, and Supervisor of Music for the entire district. A tradition of excellence in singing was established under his leadership, and each year numerous students were selected from his choir to participate in the New Jersey All-State Choir, a tradition that continues to this day. After retiring from Cranford Public Schools in 1988, Mr. Lenney served on the faculty at Kean University and was their Interim Coordinator of Music Education from 1998-2001. He has held music positions at numerous churches in the area, but since 1983, for the past 30 years, he has served at Trinity Episcopal Church in Cranford as Choirmaster and Organist.Mr. Lenney was predeceased by his mother, Majorie R. McNamara Lenney. Mr. Lenney is survived by his life partner, James Pulliam. A special thanks goes to Rev. Gina Walsh-Minor for her care and counsel, and all those who shared the love of singing cultivated by Jim.Memorial gifts to honor his service and memory may be made to the James Lenney Choral Excellence Scholarship Fund, Cranford High School. It was a life well-lived, promoting and supporting the choral art in our youth. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

UNCSW delegates discuss statelessness, universal birth registration

first_imgUNCSW delegates discuss statelessness, universal birth registration Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments (2) Erna Lund says: Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing PJ Cabbiness says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Lynette Wilson Posted Mar 17, 2015 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA UNCSW, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 March 18, 2015 at 6:59 pm Indeed in reading and re-reading this treatise on stateless children, families, refugees worldwide, there is no mention of the notably homeless Palestinian peoples throughout the world and specifically in Israel and the Middle East. Although the national Episcopal Church, the Anglican Church and Diocese of Jerusalem have been involved, there appears to be little publicity or movement for action on this highly critical humanitarian crisis. Much more could be said here in this article… and much more must be said throughout the offices, pulpits, and multiple venues. Please address the desperate needs of All peoples and certainly in the areas where Christianity was literally born–Jesus Christ of Bethlehem, Nazareth … and the disciples/apostles throughout this middle east area where Palestinian refugees have been seeking refuge since dispossession in Israel circa 1940s, and continuing with ethnic cleansing … This must be made a Priority before Christianity is entirely extinguished through violence, war, ignorance and political manipulation! New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs [Episcopal News Service] To have a nationality means to exist, though millions of people worldwide are stateless because of armed conflict, politics, border disputes and economic migration. Others are rendered stateless simply as result of never having had their births registered.“We’re talking about some of the world’s most dispossessed people,” said the Rev. Canon Flora Winfield, Anglican Communion Representative to the United Nations institutions in Geneva, Switzerland, during a March 16 discussion on statelessness and universal birth registration held at The Episcopal Church Center.More than 30 Anglicans and Episcopalians participated in the discussion, which took place in the larger context of the 59th Session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW), meeting in New York March 9-20. It included information on the status of the Anglican Communion’s campaign aimed at universal birth registration, and ways in which churches communion-wide can promote and assist parents, particularly mothers, in registering the birth of a child.Unregistered children, explained Winfield, often are more vulnerable to human trafficking, more likely to be enlisted as child soldiers, and more likely to be forced into child marriage. Additionally, they are less likely to have access to education, health care and social services.An estimated 10 million people are stateless worldwide, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, which in 2014 launched a 10-year campaign to eradicate statelessness.In addition to UNHCR, the International Anglican Family Network is working to end statelessness through a campaign for universal birth registration; it supports global efforts to ensure compliance in countries that recognize the 1989 Convention on the Rights of the Child.Globally, the births of an estimated 230 million children under the age of 5 have gone unregistered, with 59 percent of those children living in Asia, according to UNICEF, the United Nations Children’s Fund.The Anglican Family Network began its involvement toward universal birth registration three years ago, explained the Rev. Terrie Robinson, the Anglican Communion’s director for Women in Church and Society.Without a birth certificate, a person’s nationality may not be recognized; the issue is important to the church, Robinson explained, because having a nationality is a basic human right, and “having an identity and belonging in community helps us [human beings] to flourish.”Given the reach of Anglican churches around the world, the church is poised to work with organizations, such as UNICEF and Plan International that are already engaged in birth registration, to connect field workers with bishops in dioceses where births typically go unregistered.“It’s a growing, theologically grounded movement, and the church is everywhere – so we have the opportunity to slide it into existing ministry,” said Robinson.Winfield added that by assisting parents to bring their children into the fold of community, the church also helps them to later take their place as adults in civil society. When parents bring their children to church to be baptized, churches have an opportunity to ask if the birth has been registered, and assist in registering the birth if it has not.Currently in 27 countries around the world a mother cannot pass on citizenship to her baby, with 12 of them being in the Middle East and North Africa, she said. In the case of Syrian refugees, women head 25 percent of households, said Winfield.“This is not a problem that will go away soon,” she said. “Every church in every province can engage in this; it really does take all of us, as well as our partners in mission and ministry.”The March 16 discussion was facilitated by Lynnaia Main, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s officer for global relations, and came at the request of Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, who in late 2014 visited the Dominican Republic to learn about the effects of a 2013 Constitutional Court ruling that annulled the citizenship of an estimated 200,000 Dominicans of Haitian ancestry, many of them women and children whose births have gone unregistered.In May 2014, following intense political pressure and international calls for justice, the president introduced and the Dominican Congress passed a law allowing children of “irregular” migrants, or nonresidents deemed “in-transit” under a 2004 law who have birth certificates, to become citizens and those without documents to apply for legal residency and later citizenship. The deadline for those affected by the decision to submit documents to prove citizenship, including birth certificates, was Feb. 1. However, for many, particularly poor, marginalized people, obtaining a birth certificate is an arduous, expensive, if not impossible process.“The biggest problem in the Dominican Republic is the process is very complex; free but complex,” said Digna de la Cruz, of the Diocese of the Dominican Republic and who is representing Province IX at the UNCSW. “It’s a problem for people of Haitian descent, but also Dominicans who don’t have their birth certificates.Without a birth certificate, a person typically cannot obtain an identification card, which is required to study, to apply for dignified employment, to marry, to register children, to qualify for state health insurance and pensions, to open a bank account, to apply for a passport, to participate in elections, or even to be baptized.“Not to have birth registration, identity papers is serious,” said Lelanda Lee, who serves as chair of The Episcopal Church Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Advocacy and Networking. Lee explained that following the high court’s 2013 ruling, the Executive Council passed a resolution that the presiding bishop travel to the Dominican Republic on a fact-finding mission to address the statelessness issue.“It’s one thing not to allow someone to become a citizen, but to retroactively take it away just seems unbelievable,” she said.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Anglican Communion, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Women’s Ministry Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC March 19, 2015 at 9:17 pm There is no valid, recognizable Palestinian state. Palestine exists as a quasi legal fiction wherein individuals and associations can act freely, with some misguided international support, in a hostile, violent manner against the legitimate state of Israel. The Palestinians act as a proxy for other aggressive nations and interests in the pursuit of the destruction of Israel. Palestine is a fertile incubator of terrorism, violence, lawlessness and hatred and the people in the geographic areas in dispute are trespassing and impairing the rights of the Jewish people. Support for the Palestinians is support for terrorism. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

RIP: Former Missouri Bishop William (Bill) A. Jones

first_img Submit a Job Listing People AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags RIP: Former Missouri Bishop William (Bill) A. Jones Obituary, Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Oct 13, 2020 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Episcopal Diocese of Missouri] The Rt. Rev. William (Bill) A. Jones, Jr., former bishop of the Diocese of Missouri, died Sunday, Oct. 11, 2020. He was 93 years old.Jones was a native of Memphis, Tennessee. He was ordained the eighth Bishop of Missouri on May 3, 1975 and served as bishop until 1992.“I join with the people of the Diocese of Missouri in giving thanks for the life, work, and ministry of the Rt. Rev. William “Bill” Jones,” said the Rt. Rev. Deon K. Johnson, eleventh Bishop of the Diocese of Missouri. “Bishop Jones served as the eighth Bishop of the Diocese of Missouri during a period of significant change in The Episcopal Church. His pastoral presence and good humor went well beyond his tenure as Bishop Diocesan.”Following General Convention’s approval in 1976 to ordain women, Bishop Jones ordained the first woman in the Diocese of Missouri. He also worked to expand lay involvement in the diocese, establishing the Lichtenberger Society to provide spiritual opportunities for lay people. Bishop Jones re-established the Bishop and Council model and continued the diocesan tradition of responding to social needs. Under Jones’ leadership, the diocese began a new companion relationship with the Diocese in Nigeria. That relationship led to many visits, establishment of programs and longtime friendships.The bishop and his wife, Margaret Loaring-Clark Jones (Maggie), had four daughters. Bishop Jones retired in 1992 and the couple moved east, finally settling in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. His wife Maggie passed away on February 29, 2020.“I was fortunate enough to chat with Bishop Jones after my election and again after my ordination & consecration. I greatly appreciate his deep wisdom, profound insight and his willingness to support me ‘as his bishop,’’’ said Bishop Johnson. “Bishop Jones now joins with that glorious band of saints who have entered into a nearer presence with the Eternal God, and we give thanks for the tremendous impact his life and ministry has had in shaping who we are as followers of Jesus in this time and place. May Bishop Jones rest in Christ’s peace and rise in glory.” Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

Diocese of Iowa revises dates for bishop election and consecration

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL [Diocese of Iowa] The Rt. Rev. Alan Scarfe, bishop of the Diocese of Iowa, has informed the diocese that at the request of the Standing Committee he is revising the election of his successor because of the disruption of the COVID-19 pandemic. The election will now be held on July 31, moved from the original date of May 1. The date of the consecration has changed accordingly from Sept. 18 to Dec. 18, with Presiding Bishop Michael Curry as the chief consecrator. Scarfe has also postponed the date of his retirement to Dec. 18.The Standing Committee hopes to host the final slate of bishop candidates in person for a series of meetings across the diocese, and it is their understanding that the possibility of such a gathering and having candidates travel to Iowa from different parts of the country might not be likely within the original time frame. In their statement, the Standing Committee says, “We did not make this decision lightly. The process of episcopal elections is already a lengthy one, and we are prolonging it. But we are convinced that in the long run, the probability of allowing for the people of the diocese to meet and mingle with candidates, and indeed allowing the candidates to get an in-person view of the diocese and the state and people of Iowa, will lead to a more informed decision on all sides.” Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Elections Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Diocese of Iowa revises dates for bishop election and consecration Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Posted Jan 12, 2021 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more