Sourav Ganguly wants to be Indias coach Former skipper makes massive revelation

first_imgGanguly made an interesting statementIANSSourav Ganguly is regarded as one of the greatest, if not the greatest captain India ever had. He has also been working as an administrator with the Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB). But now the ‘Prince of Kolkata’ has made a revelation that will surprise many while bringing a cheer to the faces of others. The former left-handed batsman revealed that he wants to coach the Indian team someday.”Definitely, I’m interested but not at this point of time. Let one more phase go then I will throw my name into the fray. Currently, I’m associated with too many things — IPL, CAB, TV commentary.”Let me complete this. But I will definitely put my hat at some stage. Provided I get selected. But definitely, I’m interested. Not now but in the future,” the man known fondly as Dada said. Ganguly, Tendulkar and Laxman were part of the CAC in the pastThis statement comes at a time when the BCCI is in the process of selecting a coach for the Indian team. Sourav Ganguly was also part of a special committee formed in 2016 to select the next Indian coach along with Sachin Tendulkar and VVS Laxman. At that time, he had a fallout with Ravi Shastri as the latter accused the former national captain of being ‘disrespectful’ by not being present when he made his presentation.The same people were again constituted into the Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC) for selecting a coach when Anil Kumble left the job in 2017 and this time, they did select Shastri as the coach. The ill-feeling between the two men has persisted and occasionally spurts out in form of snide remarks towards each other.This time around, Dada is not expressing his opinion about who should be given that job. “Going by the applicants, I don’t see any heavyweight names. I heard Mahela (Jayawardene) would apply but ultimately he didn’t. Ultimately I don’t know what the panel will decide. They have been around for a while. We will see how long the term the coach will give,” Ganguly added.last_img read more

A piece of Bangladesh in the sea

first_img.Red crabs scuttle across the sandy beach. Thousands of birds soar above the island newly emerged off the Kuakata coast, 40 kilometres from the southeast corner of Gangamoti. It appears to be a ‘little’ Bangladesh within Bangladesh.The new island was discovered by a group of tourists recently. They went to visit the island after hearing about it from fishermen on 5 December.The local fishermen named it ‘Hairer Chor’. ‘Hair’, in local dialect, refers to the boundary determined for the fishermen for fishing.The tourists have named the island ‘Chor Bijoy’ (Island of Victory) as it has been discovered in the month of victory. They hoisted a national flag in the island..The island has been officially named ‘Chor Bijoy’ by the municipal administration of Kuakata. Officials of the local administration, forest department and other organisations visited the island on Wednesday.Tourists Shima Akhter and her husband were among those who visited the island for the first time. She told Prothom Alo, “We have travelled to so many places, but such a beautiful island in the middle of the sea was beyond our imagination. We were overwhelmed. The beauty was out of this world.”According to the fishermen, the island goes under water during the monsoons and reappears in winter. The marginal fishermen go to the island then and set up temporary abode. They stay there for three months to catch fish and dry them.The island stretches is 10 kilometres long and 3 kilometres wide, stretching from the east to west. The length and breadth reduce to 3 kilometres and 1 kilometre respectively during high tide..Fisherman Altaf Hossain said, generally the fishermen from Gangamoti and Kawar Char go to this island. The island first started to appear around four years ago and finally emerged and became visible two years ago. The fishermen then started to go to the island to fish and process dried fish. The tourist group of ‘Kuakata Sea Tourism’ went to the island recently. Kuakata Bangabandhu High School’s head master and the assistant headmaster visited the island along with tourists from Dhaka.”We did not know about such a beautiful island near Kuakata. We only came to know about it from the fishermen and went there. We called this enchanting island ‘Chor Bijoy’ as it has been discovered in the month of victory,” Johnny Alamgir, an official of Kuakata Sea Tourism, told Prothom Alo.*The article originally published in Prothom Alo print edition has been rewritten in English by Farjana Liakat.last_img read more

Researchers build Moon garden

first_imgMurat Kacira at the Controlled Environment Agriculture Center. Image credit: Norma Jean Gargasz/UANews. Developed by Phil Sadler of the Sadler Machine Co. and Gene Giacomelli and other researchers at the University of Arizona, the 18-foot-long greenhouse would be buried underneath the Moon’s surface to avoid deadly cosmic rays and solar flares. Plants can grow without soil in the greenhouse thanks to hydroponic technology, mineral nutrient solutions, and long envelopes that hold the seeds in place as they start growing.The greenhouse is designed so that the plants can get carbon dioxide from the astronauts’ exhaled breaths. Furthermore, even the water for the plants can be extracted from human urine. The astronauts wouldn’t need to go underground to deliver these ingredients to the plants; instead, the carbon dioxide and water would be supplied into the underground greenhouse from a surface lunar base through pressurized tanks. Similarly, sunlight could be supplied to the plants through fiber optic cables. The researchers designed the greenhouse to operate remotely or even autonomously, so that food could be ready when astronauts arrive. The entire system can be collapsed into a four-foot-wide disk, sent to the Moon, and deployed in 10 minutes. With the option of being monitored from Earth by sensors and cameras, it will then take about 30 days for the vegetables to grow.”You can think of this as a robotic mechanism that is providing food, oxygen and fresh drinking water,” Giacomelli said in a press release.Overall, the lunar greenhouse contains approximately 220 pounds of wet plant material that can provide 53 quarts of potable water and 0.75 pounds of oxygen during a 24-hour period, while consuming about 100 kilowatts of electricity and a pound of carbon dioxide. Many of the garden’s features come from the South Pole Growth Chamber here on Earth, which was previously designed by the Sadler Machine Co. The growth chamber has to overcome some of the same challenges for certain months of the year when the circulating ocean currents cut the pole off from the rest of the world. The researchers are also looking at using similar technology for use in urban gardens in heavily populated areas, where fertile soil is scarce.”There’s great interest in providing locally grown, fresh food in cities, for growing food right where masses of people are living,” Giacomelli said. “It’s the idea of growing high-quality fresh food that only has to be transported very short distances. There also would be a sense of agriculture returning to the everyday lives of urban dwellers.” The Moon is not the most hospitable place for growing fruits and vegetables. The lack of atmosphere and natural water, extreme temperatures, and exposure to cosmic rays present some serious challenges for future inhabitants who want to pursue sustainable living on the Moon. With these challenges in mind, scientists have built a lunar greenhouse that is designed to grow plants such as potatoes, peanuts, tomatoes, and peppers under the Moon’s extreme conditions. Explore further US scientists plan greenhouses on the Moon Citation: Researchers build Moon garden (2010, September 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-09-moon-garden.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: University of Arizona’s Controlled Environment Agriculture Centervia: UANewslast_img read more